4,296 reputation
1226
bio website keegan.aws.af.cm/index.html
location Ontario
age
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 15 hours ago

BS Physics (received)

MS Computational Neuroscience (received)

PhD Theoretical Neuroscience (attending/pursuing)

Published Paper: Transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Morris-Lecar neuronal network

Psychedelic improv band: Luop Garou


Dec
31
comment Why is “breaking a car” considered a sort of therapy?
Here's a similar conclusion from a 2002 study.
Dec
30
comment Can a biological entity be thought as a simple algorithm? Case-study with the concept of randomness
Also, an interesting note about multiple realizability. What I call 'degeneracy' in my answer is the observable analog of multiple relizability, but pertaining to function. If you believe mind is a functional result (as is typical of monism and physicalism) then degeneracy is multiple realizability.
Dec
30
comment Can a biological entity be thought as a simple algorithm? Case-study with the concept of randomness
I've edited my answer to make my ontology clearer so your first reference to my post is inconsistent now. My issue with life being reduced to just algorithms is more because I favor the dynamical systems view of continuous evolution of states (and that how humans break such processes into algorithmic steps is a more about human ontology than nature). My ontology views life, inevitably, as a very complicated classical physics problem. Algorithms would be an emergent property of living things (and other physical processes) as opposed to what life is reduced to.
Dec
28
comment What does it mean to overthink?
The phrase over thinking is generally used when somebody contrives a complicated theory to explain something that can already be explained with knowledge common to all parties involved.
Dec
27
comment Neurotransmitter control via biofeedback?
Neurotransmitter levels are determined by metabolic processes and demand. Humans control whole systems of their body, not individual cells or molecules, so the original thread you linked is, as far as I know, as close as you're going to get. But there, you'd be controlling the whole system and neurotransmitter levels would just be a consequence.
Dec
15
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
I see. The number of bits is equal to N, the number of binary questions asked to locate a point on a partition. So you could just keep breaking your continuous variable up into smaller partitions and asking if your point is inside of it and then your resolution is equal to the number of partitions (which represents the number of questions). But how would this tell you how much information is "being produced"? The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is a direct measurement of information production. The units are generally entorpy/time, but I think you can conceive them as bits if using partitions.
Dec
8
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
Scholarpedia discusses when it's appropriate to use bits (for yes/no questions) and the error associated with not doing it. I work with dynamical systems and presume deterministic mechanisms in my systems, so I think I'd go with Kolmogorov Entropy. But the nature of the question would still be an important consideration. My tendency is to assume things exist more on a spectrum than binary yes/no, but I'm sure there are simplifying cases.
Dec
8
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
It would depend on the model and the question being asked and the definition of information and what you hope to get with that definition.
Sep
12
comment Why do people make rants on Meta Stack Exchange sites?
speculation: negativity is more typical on the internet in general, because we don't get the vocal and facial feedback from our audience that we would in a live setting. Negative comments probably still come up in person, but they don't (as often) develop into a rant.
Sep
9
comment What is the neurobiological basis of Spearman general factor of intelligence?
imo, intelligence is an ill-defined term. I think it would take volumes to answer the question as is. Narrowing it down might be productive.
Jul
31
comment How did the unique features of human intelligence evolve?
I think that's a debate in itself, but since it's not a primary point, I will just remove it to avoid the distraction.
Jul
31
comment How did the unique features of human intelligence evolve?
Also, I don't think insects "reason". They certainly process information... whether they're intelligent or not depends on how you define intelligence (different researchers will define it different ways, but there's a lot of room for anthropomorphizing there.)
Jul
31
comment How did the unique features of human intelligence evolve?
the question has been changed since I answered it, from human reasoning (a process with an associated verb: to reason) to human intelligence (a much broader concept). I don't equate "general information processing" to either human intelligence or human reasoning. Even inanimate objects can process information.
Jul
9
comment Why does repeating one word over and over again sound weird to us after some time?
speculative: words only have meaning holistically and in context, if you reduce them they're just sounds. The more you say a word over and over, the more I think you lose context about it and your brain starts to focus on the reductionist aspects of it. Brains get bored with repetitive stimulus so reinterpreting a persistent stimulus might do something to avoid that boredom.
Jul
8
comment Transsexuality in animals other than humans?
yes you're right, edited.
Jul
3
comment Why do people want what they don't have now?
If had time I'd provide a more referenced answer, but once seeking behavior is procedural, dopamine responses become linked with the procedure of seeking itself (and then there's a let down if the object is not found).
Jun
28
comment What neurological processes occur with 'revulsion'?
I remember reading that disgust, even if social or visual, had a lot of overlap in activity patterns with the same circuits involved in physiological nausea.
Jun
28
comment As for future mind control/reading technology, can humans fight it?
It depends. If a "lower" function is hijacked, it may be able to be overridden by regions that retain control "upstream" in the control flow. If the "higher level" functions are actually being hijacked, I don't see how there's much you could do. Of course, this is speculation, but I think that due to the numerous ways ways in which individual brains can retain information, a certain amount of training would be required to get the machine and the brain to interface (whether brain->machine or machine->brain). Thus, it would require some obvious intrusions on privacy.
Jun
24
comment Is multitasking a myth?
I can't guarantee that I'll have time to be more thorough anytime soon, or I'd make it an official answer with references. If I find time, I'll do so, but I welcome anyone else to dig up the resources (I'd probably just go to google and/or google scholar myself).
Jun
24
comment Is multitasking a myth?
I think it depends on how you define multi tasking. Certainly we can listen to words while we watch the mouth, processing two different streams and integrating them. But if you play two different audio streams into the ears, most people can only focus on one of them at a time. With a little bit of practice, one can pat the head as they rub the belly. There was a study that showed that office multitaskers made significant sacrifices to work quality. Another study shows worse reaction times for drivers when they are on the cell phone.