3,714 reputation
1124
bio website keegan.aws.af.cm/index.html
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen 20 mins ago

BS Physics (received)

MS Computational Neuroscience (received)

PhD Theoretical Neuroscience (attending/pursuing)

Published Paper: Transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Morris-Lecar neuronal network

My psychedelic improv band: Luop Garou - The Deportation Tapes


May
3
comment In a central pattern generator based on reciprocal inhibition, how does one “side” get picked over the other to start out?
I down-voted this answer. Noise does inject assymetry into the system. However, a much stronger, system-regulated mechanism of assymetey is connection strength. This can come in the form of 1) number of interconnections, 2) regulation of the amount of neurotransmitter released 3) autoregulation of a specific cell 4) regulation of neurotransmitter receptor density 5) other connections or astrocytes or even local environment regulating the excitability of individual cells.
Apr
19
comment What is the difference between psychophysics and neurophysiology?
I would say neurophysiology also included emergent behavior, like breathing or heartbeat, not just underlying anatomical structure. That's essentially the difference: psychophysics (as you say) pertains to subjective experience, while neurophysiology pertains to objective processes.
Apr
17
comment Do victims of parental abuse and neglect become abusive or neglectful parents?
I feel like "bad parenting" is a very arbitrary term... maybe you could e more specific for each example.
Apr
14
comment What causes an individual to not be able to hold all the details of a large project in memory?
sounds like "seeing the forest for the trees" or the "Gestalt" of it all. The "big picture". These are all terms we use in society, anyway. Not sure of the formal psychology term. I think your question could be more concise and include initial research once we find it, though.
Apr
9
comment Training for the corpus callosum?
have a look at the wiring
Apr
8
comment Training for the corpus callosum?
there's a left and right field in each eye. but regardless, the point is that it all goes through left hemisphere for interpretation, after being visually encoded
Apr
8
comment Training for the corpus callosum?
As the first comment reply to your question implies, your visual field is not correlated to left-brain text-interpretation in that way. If the text is seen by the whole field, it goes through both occipital lobes (on both sides of the brain) and then from occipital lobes, goes to the left hemisphere. It would be the same if you used only used a single field. It doesn't matter what visual field it enters through, it still goes to the left cortex for interpretation.
Apr
4
comment Intelligence and marriage satisfaction
I wonder what would happen if one controlled for "meeting in college". Assuming people in college are more intelligent by the IQ measure, then a contributing factor may be two intelligent people just being in the same place at the same time, rather than an attraction to intelligence. Just a thought.
Apr
1
comment Should questions in psychology always be objective questions?
Color perception and taste can be an important aspect of psychology. It's more on the cognitive scientific side than the clinical medical side, but its still science. Think of it as asking a rock how fast it falls then asking a feather. You get different answers, but you're still asking scientific questions.
Mar
31
comment At what point do multiple personas for social context cross into multiple personalities disorder?
Is MPD/DID still considered a real disorder?
Mar
20
comment What does the literature suggest about the optimal strategy for quickly memorizing various types of content?
If I remember from the literature, spatial (rather than procedural or sequential) learning strategies are actually more robust in the long term. One technique that's often cited (and goes back the Greeks) is the memory palace, where you imagine the concepts you're learning as objects in rooms of a building you're familiar with.
Mar
18
comment Is there a name for the tendency to use proper nouns often in conversation?
I think it's just sounds more like speculative discussion rather than scientific inquiry. Because it happened to you is just an anecdote.
Mar
17
comment Is there a name for the tendency to use proper nouns often in conversation?
I think this question is somewhat loaded. Can OP show that "shy people" name drop more than confident people? How do you know that you're net being selective in your memories of personal interactions?
Mar
17
comment Is there a name for the tendency to use proper nouns often in conversation?
Also could be considered an appeal to authority.
Mar
12
comment Hebbian Learning Rule, Local or Global?
I don't think I indicate that it only affects local neurons. How the rule affects network outcome requires a higher level of inference and appears outside the scope of the question to me. I didn't comment one way or another on networks.
Mar
11
comment Hebbian Learning Rule, Local or Global?
I don't particularly disagree with your comment, but I'm not sure of what your point is.
Mar
9
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
I don't really know that bits is a sensible way to think about information processing in nervous systems. I'd need to he convinced
Mar
7
comment Is fear rational?
I'm not sure I agree that the emotion itself is rational. The action of running away from danger is rational, but the emotion is supplementary.
Mar
5
comment What are the effects of social rejection on the brain?
NeuroSynth (a meta analysis of fMRI results from several studies) tags several parts of the brain in association with the word "pain". I wonder which parts are activated in social rejection and what part they play in physical pain.
Mar
4
comment What is the bias/thought process that results in distrust of “formal” knowledge in favor of “folk” knowledge?
This sounds like assimilation vs accomodation