4,132 reputation
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bio website keegan.aws.af.cm/index.html
location Ontario
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

BS Physics (received)

MS Computational Neuroscience (received)

PhD Theoretical Neuroscience (attending/pursuing)

Published Paper: Transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Morris-Lecar neuronal network

My psychedelic improv band: Luop Garou - The Deportation Tapes


Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Also, for clarity, with regards to "integrated information", you are cherry picking a follow-up study that demonstrates the clinical significance of Tononi's work. Tononi's original paper on integrated information does indeed mention qualia space (right in the abstract). Its extension to clinical practices (Casali et al 2013) is not a limitation, but a clinical measurement of the theoretical definition. Furthermore, many of your points are acknowledged in the introduction to Tononi's paper (I encourage you to read it, it is free).
Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
The only conflict is your tone of dismissal. We could go to the physics stack exchange and question their views on gravity using Solipsism, but that's not very constructive. We use empiricism in science, which is why we had Newtonian physics for a long time before quantum physics. And that's fine, we needed Newtonian physics as a foundation to build off of.
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Computationalism has important implications for cognition and cognition and consciousness are, of course, intimately related (quite necessarily in the computational view). I will present evidence that talks about this a little bit, but most of the evidence is connectionist (which is not necessarily mutually exclusive from computationalism).
Jan
3
comment Will a person with an artificial heart have feelings if heart is the organ to feel emotions?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about philosophy
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
I should also note that computational approach is not exculsively philosophy; it is a prominent cognitive psychology approach (as discussed in the wiki link posted by the OP).
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
There's actually a wealth of neuroscience articles defining consciousness and making various empirical conclusions. I will post links later. I've been meaning to get to this thread.
Jan
3
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
No, it was just an interesting question so I wanted to read about it. Not finding a lot of time lately though.
Jan
1
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
Thanks! Here's a free version of the paper. I'm still working through it, myself. My impression is that you basically can always rely on objects being made up of edges with orientations, so they're fixed (invariant) inputs, but each object is an emergent combination of the fixed inputs, so they need selectivity to distinguish particular emergent shapes from other emergent shapes at higher abstraction levels, but still be able to recognize the object in different perspectives or configurations so S can't be too invariant.
Jan
1
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
Hi Christina, welcome to cogsci. Would you mind posting the source to your figures?
Dec
31
comment Neural Microfilaments for Computation?
you could probably start a thread about it. Look up Benjamin Libet.
Dec
31
comment Why is “breaking a car” considered a sort of therapy?
Here's a similar conclusion from a 2002 study.
Dec
30
comment Can a biological entity be thought as a simple algorithm? Case-study with the concept of randomness
Also, an interesting note about multiple realizability. What I call 'degeneracy' in my answer is the observable analog of multiple relizability, but pertaining to function. If you believe mind is a functional result (as is typical of monism and physicalism) then degeneracy is multiple realizability.
Dec
30
comment Can a biological entity be thought as a simple algorithm? Case-study with the concept of randomness
I've edited my answer to make my ontology clearer so your first reference to my post is inconsistent now. My issue with life being reduced to just algorithms is more because I favor the dynamical systems view of continuous evolution of states (and that how humans break such processes into algorithmic steps is a more about human ontology than nature). My ontology views life, inevitably, as a very complicated classical physics problem. Algorithms would be an emergent property of living things (and other physical processes) as opposed to what life is reduced to.
Dec
28
comment What does it mean to overthink?
The phrase over thinking is generally used when somebody contrives a complicated theory to explain something that can already be explained with knowledge common to all parties involved.
Dec
27
comment Neurotransmitter control via biofeedback?
Neurotransmitter levels are determined by metabolic processes and demand. Humans control whole systems of their body, not individual cells or molecules, so the original thread you linked is, as far as I know, as close as you're going to get. But there, you'd be controlling the whole system and neurotransmitter levels would just be a consequence.
Dec
15
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
I see. The number of bits is equal to N, the number of binary questions asked to locate a point on a partition. So you could just keep breaking your continuous variable up into smaller partitions and asking if your point is inside of it and then your resolution is equal to the number of partitions (which represents the number of questions). But how would this tell you how much information is "being produced"? The Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy is a direct measurement of information production. The units are generally entorpy/time, but I think you can conceive them as bits if using partitions.
Dec
8
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
Scholarpedia discusses when it's appropriate to use bits (for yes/no questions) and the error associated with not doing it. I work with dynamical systems and presume deterministic mechanisms in my systems, so I think I'd go with Kolmogorov Entropy. But the nature of the question would still be an important consideration. My tendency is to assume things exist more on a spectrum than binary yes/no, but I'm sure there are simplifying cases.
Dec
8
comment How much information does the somatosensory system produce?
It would depend on the model and the question being asked and the definition of information and what you hope to get with that definition.
Sep
12
comment Why do people make rants on Meta Stack Exchange sites?
speculation: negativity is more typical on the internet in general, because we don't get the vocal and facial feedback from our audience that we would in a live setting. Negative comments probably still come up in person, but they don't (as often) develop into a rant.
Sep
9
comment What is the neurobiological basis of Spearman general factor of intelligence?
imo, intelligence is an ill-defined term. I think it would take volumes to answer the question as is. Narrowing it down might be productive.