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Feb
12
comment When was it recognized that thinking occurs in the brain and not in the heart?
Yes, the misconception existed. Egyptians demonstrate ignorance of the brain. It was one of the organs they didn't preserve; they didn't think it would be useful in the afterlife. The reason the heart got so much attention (and blood) is that you can see veins going through the whole body with your eyes and you can see they all connect to the heart. You can't see nerves going through the whole body so easily.
Jan
24
comment Is there another example of a strongly emergent phenomenon besides the mind?
I disagree that mind has to be strongly emergent. It can just as easily be weakly emergent. I would, therefore, move to close your question as a loaded one. See if you can ask it from a more neutral position.
Jan
24
comment Analysing physiological measurements acquired by MP150 modules for auditory experiments
Can you be more specific? What kind of data are you measuring (i.e. a time series of field potentials or intracellular data)? What part of the analysis do you need help with (i.e. coding, mathematics, interpretation?) As it stands, this is a very broad question.
Jan
17
comment Why do humans/primates laugh/smile when they are happy, and not cry?
I don't think there's any significant reason, it just happens to be the way our wiring worked out, that particular facial muscle contractions are associated with particular experiences. If we were to start mammals over again, the random mutations could have led a different direction. What's important, and possibly selected for as social creatures, is that we can distinguish cries from smiles to infer feelings of others. But it doesn't particularly matter what the symbol is as long as everyone knows it. Just like an A is an arbitrary set of squiggles and only has meaning by convention.
Jan
16
comment Definitions of consciousness
This one too.
Jan
12
comment Is handwriting style heritable?
It would probably be easier to answer the question if you made it more general and less personal: "Is handwriting heritable?" could be an alternative.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
If you'd like to know more, look up "reproduction of the fittest" as "survival of the fittest" is really a misnomer. We should probably stop this side point. If you like, you can ask questions at the biology Stack exchange for further clarification.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
Thats really completely incorrect. This is really a whole 'nother discussion, but any line that was "stronger" but didn't reproduce isn't around today. Many organisms finds ways besides strength to reproduce. Your simplistic argument of larger testes really underlies a misunderstanding of basic evolutionary principles.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
The evolutionary argument for male promiscuity is that promiscuous males can have more offspring than promiscuous females so a brute force evolutionary simulation would favor male promiscuity. Of course evolution is more complicated than that, but I simplify for brevity.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
Casey, it's an evolutionary argument. Evolutionary motivation shouldn't be confused with human motivation. Nobody is saying sexuality ends when someone becomes pregnant.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
In terms of reproductive advantage, female mammals can only get pregnant once every 9 months, but males can get several females pregnant in 9 months. There are probably many more factors, but this seems like it would play a role in sexual selection.
Jan
4
comment What is a scientifically plausible method by which people might in the future be able to read minds?
This is a sci-fi, not cog sci, question.
Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Also, for clarity, with regards to "integrated information", you are cherry picking a follow-up study that demonstrates the clinical significance of Tononi's work. Tononi's original paper on integrated information does indeed mention qualia space (right in the abstract). Its extension to clinical practices (Casali et al 2013) is not a limitation, but a clinical measurement of the theoretical definition. Furthermore, many of your points are acknowledged in the introduction to Tononi's paper (I encourage you to read it, it is free).
Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
The only conflict is your tone of dismissal. We could go to the physics stack exchange and question their views on gravity using Solipsism, but that's not very constructive. We use empiricism in science, which is why we had Newtonian physics for a long time before quantum physics. And that's fine, we needed Newtonian physics as a foundation to build off of.
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Computationalism has important implications for cognition and cognition and consciousness are, of course, intimately related (quite necessarily in the computational view). I will present evidence that talks about this a little bit, but most of the evidence is connectionist (which is not necessarily mutually exclusive from computationalism).
Jan
3
comment Will a person with an artificial heart have feelings if heart is the organ to feel emotions?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about philosophy
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
I should also note that computational approach is not exculsively philosophy; it is a prominent cognitive psychology approach (as discussed in the wiki link posted by the OP).
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
There's actually a wealth of neuroscience articles defining consciousness and making various empirical conclusions. I will post links later. I've been meaning to get to this thread.
Jan
3
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
No, it was just an interesting question so I wanted to read about it. Not finding a lot of time lately though.
Jan
1
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
Thanks! Here's a free version of the paper. I'm still working through it, myself. My impression is that you basically can always rely on objects being made up of edges with orientations, so they're fixed (invariant) inputs, but each object is an emergent combination of the fixed inputs, so they need selectivity to distinguish particular emergent shapes from other emergent shapes at higher abstraction levels, but still be able to recognize the object in different perspectives or configurations so S can't be too invariant.