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visits member for 1 year, 11 months
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BS Physics (received)

MS Computational Neuroscience (received)

PhD Theoretical Neuroscience (attending/pursuing)

Published Paper: Transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Morris-Lecar neuronal network

My psychedelic improv band: Luop Garou - The Deportation Tapes


Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
If you'd like to know more, look up "reproduction of the fittest" as "survival of the fittest" is really a misnomer. We should probably stop this side point. If you like, you can ask questions at the biology Stack exchange for further clarification.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
Thats really completely incorrect. This is really a whole 'nother discussion, but any line that was "stronger" but didn't reproduce isn't around today. Many organisms finds ways besides strength to reproduce. Your simplistic argument of larger testes really underlies a misunderstanding of basic evolutionary principles.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
The evolutionary argument for male promiscuity is that promiscuous males can have more offspring than promiscuous females so a brute force evolutionary simulation would favor male promiscuity. Of course evolution is more complicated than that, but I simplify for brevity.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
Casey, it's an evolutionary argument. Evolutionary motivation shouldn't be confused with human motivation. Nobody is saying sexuality ends when someone becomes pregnant.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
In terms of reproductive advantage, female mammals can only get pregnant once every 9 months, but males can get several females pregnant in 9 months. There are probably many more factors, but this seems like it would play a role in sexual selection.
Jan
4
comment What is a scientifically plausible method by which people might in the future be able to read minds?
This is a sci-fi, not cog sci, question.
Jan
4
comment Crossing the leg, what does it mean?
It could just be a posture thing and not have any intrinsic sociological/psychological meaning. If you stand for very long (as in giving lectures) you will adopt several different postures that relax different muscles to give different sets of muscles a break. Crossing allows you to reinforce one leg with the other, too, distributing the load.
Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Also, for clarity, with regards to "integrated information", you are cherry picking a follow-up study that demonstrates the clinical significance of Tononi's work. Tononi's original paper on integrated information does indeed mention qualia space (right in the abstract). Its extension to clinical practices (Casali et al 2013) is not a limitation, but a clinical measurement of the theoretical definition. Furthermore, many of your points are acknowledged in the introduction to Tononi's paper (I encourage you to read it, it is free).
Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
The only conflict is your tone of dismissal. We could go to the physics stack exchange and question their views on gravity using Solipsism, but that's not very constructive. We use empiricism in science, which is why we had Newtonian physics for a long time before quantum physics. And that's fine, we needed Newtonian physics as a foundation to build off of.
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Computationalism has important implications for cognition and cognition and consciousness are, of course, intimately related (quite necessarily in the computational view). I will present evidence that talks about this a little bit, but most of the evidence is connectionist (which is not necessarily mutually exclusive from computationalism).
Jan
3
comment Will a person with an artificial heart have feelings if heart is the organ to feel emotions?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about philosophy
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
I should also note that computational approach is not exculsively philosophy; it is a prominent cognitive psychology approach (as discussed in the wiki link posted by the OP).
Jan
3
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
There's actually a wealth of neuroscience articles defining consciousness and making various empirical conclusions. I will post links later. I've been meaning to get to this thread.
Jan
3
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
No, it was just an interesting question so I wanted to read about it. Not finding a lot of time lately though.
Jan
1
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
Thanks! Here's a free version of the paper. I'm still working through it, myself. My impression is that you basically can always rely on objects being made up of edges with orientations, so they're fixed (invariant) inputs, but each object is an emergent combination of the fixed inputs, so they need selectivity to distinguish particular emergent shapes from other emergent shapes at higher abstraction levels, but still be able to recognize the object in different perspectives or configurations so S can't be too invariant.
Jan
1
comment Computational model of biological object recognition
Hi Christina, welcome to cogsci. Would you mind posting the source to your figures?
Dec
31
comment Neural Microfilaments for Computation?
you could probably start a thread about it. Look up Benjamin Libet.
Dec
31
comment Why is “breaking a car” considered a sort of therapy?
Here's a similar conclusion from a 2002 study.
Dec
30
comment Can a biological entity be thought as a simple algorithm? Case-study with the concept of randomness
Also, an interesting note about multiple realizability. What I call 'degeneracy' in my answer is the observable analog of multiple relizability, but pertaining to function. If you believe mind is a functional result (as is typical of monism and physicalism) then degeneracy is multiple realizability.
Dec
30
comment Can a biological entity be thought as a simple algorithm? Case-study with the concept of randomness
I've edited my answer to make my ontology clearer so your first reference to my post is inconsistent now. My issue with life being reduced to just algorithms is more because I favor the dynamical systems view of continuous evolution of states (and that how humans break such processes into algorithmic steps is a more about human ontology than nature). My ontology views life, inevitably, as a very complicated classical physics problem. Algorithms would be an emergent property of living things (and other physical processes) as opposed to what life is reduced to.