4,082 reputation
1225
bio website keegan.aws.af.cm/index.html
location Ontario
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen 7 hours ago

BS Physics (received)

MS Computational Neuroscience (received)

PhD Theoretical Neuroscience (attending/pursuing)

Published Paper: Transient spatiotemporal chaos in the Morris-Lecar neuronal network

My psychedelic improv band: Luop Garou - The Deportation Tapes


Apr
9
comment Why do people get “too old to learn”?
Who do you think it is underestimated by? Society in general or researchers? I would argue that most people studying behavior account for it. The general method for teasing environmental from genetic traits is monozygotic twin studies. Here is one such study, Here is another, and Here is a review on the "use it or lose it" perspective.
Apr
8
comment Why do people get “too old to learn”?
I'm sure environment plays a significant role, but the biological role is well documented.
Apr
4
comment How are personality traits “encoded” in the brain?
I've updated the answer with more detail as to how the authors are explaining the how.
Apr
4
comment How are personality traits “encoded” in the brain?
How is still a matter of hypotheses. The authors introduce hypotheses in the beginning, but also reference literature (such as Depue & Collins). Encoded is probably not the right word though; "encoded" is used to describe lower processes like sensory processing well (rate coding, for example) but personality is more of an emergent property.
Mar
30
comment Super polymath feasibility: Is it possible to have the highest intellectual ability in every area?
I agree with this answer. With each additional measured trait, the probability of them simultaneously being in the 90th+ percentile for a single person approaches 0. So possible? Sure. Probable? Not very.
Mar
7
comment What subjects to study in order to prepare for a research career in theoretical neuroscience?
My undergraduate was in physics, so I took all the standard physics courses. During my Master's degree, I took a lot of classic neuroscience courses and a Nonlinear Dynamics course through the physics department. For my PhD, I am taking Mathematical Cellular Biology, Perturbation Theory, Asymptotic Analysis, and Numerical Methods in Partial Differential Equations. I've also taken a neuroscience course where we discuss, report, and present on the current literature in neuroscience.
Feb
12
comment When was it recognized that thinking occurs in the brain and not in the heart?
Yes, the misconception existed. Egyptians demonstrate ignorance of the brain. It was one of the organs they didn't preserve; they didn't think it would be useful in the afterlife. The reason the heart got so much attention (and blood) is that you can see veins going through the whole body with your eyes and you can see they all connect to the heart. You can't see nerves going through the whole body so easily.
Jan
24
comment Is there another example of a strongly emergent phenomenon besides the mind?
I disagree that mind has to be strongly emergent. It can just as easily be weakly emergent. I would, therefore, move to close your question as a loaded one. See if you can ask it from a more neutral position.
Jan
24
comment How to analyse physiological measurements acquired by MP150 modules for auditory experiments?
Can you be more specific? What kind of data are you measuring (i.e. a time series of field potentials or intracellular data)? What part of the analysis do you need help with (i.e. coding, mathematics, interpretation?) As it stands, this is a very broad question.
Jan
17
comment Why do humans/primates laugh/smile when they are happy, and not cry?
I don't think there's any significant reason, it just happens to be the way our wiring worked out, that particular facial muscle contractions are associated with particular experiences. If we were to start mammals over again, the random mutations could have led a different direction. What's important, and possibly selected for as social creatures, is that we can distinguish cries from smiles to infer feelings of others. But it doesn't particularly matter what the symbol is as long as everyone knows it. Just like an A is an arbitrary set of squiggles and only has meaning by convention.
Jan
16
comment Definitions of consciousness
This one too.
Jan
12
comment Is handwriting style heritable?
It would probably be easier to answer the question if you made it more general and less personal: "Is handwriting heritable?" could be an alternative.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
If you'd like to know more, look up "reproduction of the fittest" as "survival of the fittest" is really a misnomer. We should probably stop this side point. If you like, you can ask questions at the biology Stack exchange for further clarification.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
Thats really completely incorrect. This is really a whole 'nother discussion, but any line that was "stronger" but didn't reproduce isn't around today. Many organisms finds ways besides strength to reproduce. Your simplistic argument of larger testes really underlies a misunderstanding of basic evolutionary principles.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
The evolutionary argument for male promiscuity is that promiscuous males can have more offspring than promiscuous females so a brute force evolutionary simulation would favor male promiscuity. Of course evolution is more complicated than that, but I simplify for brevity.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
Casey, it's an evolutionary argument. Evolutionary motivation shouldn't be confused with human motivation. Nobody is saying sexuality ends when someone becomes pregnant.
Jan
10
comment Mulitiple partners: macho man vs. easy woman?
In terms of reproductive advantage, female mammals can only get pregnant once every 9 months, but males can get several females pregnant in 9 months. There are probably many more factors, but this seems like it would play a role in sexual selection.
Jan
4
comment What is a scientifically plausible method by which people might in the future be able to read minds?
This is a sci-fi, not cog sci, question.
Jan
4
comment Crossing the leg, what does it mean?
It could just be a posture thing and not have any intrinsic sociological/psychological meaning. If you stand for very long (as in giving lectures) you will adopt several different postures that relax different muscles to give different sets of muscles a break. Crossing allows you to reinforce one leg with the other, too, distributing the load.
Jan
4
comment How can machine possibly possess consciousness if computation is a human idea?
Also, for clarity, with regards to "integrated information", you are cherry picking a follow-up study that demonstrates the clinical significance of Tononi's work. Tononi's original paper on integrated information does indeed mention qualia space (right in the abstract). Its extension to clinical practices (Casali et al 2013) is not a limitation, but a clinical measurement of the theoretical definition. Furthermore, many of your points are acknowledged in the introduction to Tononi's paper (I encourage you to read it, it is free).