231 reputation
110
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location Germany
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 15 hours ago

Mar
19
awarded  Scholar
Mar
19
accepted What do we call the “middle” variables in a complex research model?
Mar
19
awarded  Yearling
Mar
19
comment Modern name for the two kind of ethics proposed by Nietzche
@Revious I am not planning to edit your question. But if you think that the new title is a different question (and it seems to me to be so), you can re-edit, or roll it back, to attain your original meaning. (Unless the original was off topic and somebody edited it in order to save it from closing, but as far as I can tell, this is not the case here).
Mar
19
comment Modern name for the two kind of ethics proposed by Nietzche
@Revious your question doesn't make much sense to me. The way something could be classified as "unhealthy" in this context would be to recognize it as a symptom of a mental illness. To my knowledge, no illness is defined by holding a certain moral (or personal, or other type) value. Even if you look at personality disorders like narcisissm, a symptom is to have an inappropriately high amount of pride in oneself; the pride itself is not a symptom, and all people have it in some amount.
Mar
19
comment Modern name for the two kind of ethics proposed by Nietzche
I would be very weary of connecting concepts from different theories to each other just because they seem to have a similar meaning when you squint at their definitions the right way. When you test such a theory empirically, it frequently fails. I have read books which see this kind of reasoning as a bias, search for "representativeness heuristic" and "representativeness bias".
Mar
19
comment What do we call the “middle” variables in a complex research model?
I still think that Academia is the best place for it, as it is about research methodology, completely independent from any discipline or of statistical methods. See my question where I argue about this, and the community seems to agree with me. meta.academia.stackexchange.com/questions/779/…
Mar
18
asked What do we call the “middle” variables in a complex research model?
Feb
11
awarded  Teacher
Feb
11
revised Is there some hierarchy of the human senses?
added quote on 95% of perception being memory
Feb
11
answered Is there some hierarchy of the human senses?
Feb
10
awarded  Commentator
Feb
10
comment Is there a precise definition of “attitude”?
@StevenJeuris I edited it. You are right, I should have looked it up right before posting. It has been some time since I read on this topic, and I didn't realize how vague the question sounds. And Nick, thank you for the edited answer.
Feb
10
awarded  Editor
Feb
10
revised Is there a precise definition of “attitude”?
updated with affect part
Feb
10
comment Is there some hierarchy of the human senses?
Maybe I didn't understand your question then (sorry, I don't what the wiring analogy is supposed to be similar to). I was saying that you cannot use pre-recognition units of information to compare the amount of information reaching the sensory organs, because such units don't exist in any sense which is meaningful to perception. You cannot say that "one eye fixation carries the same amount of information as X vibrations of the cochlea". You may find some technical definition of information which allows you a comparison, but this won't have anything to do with what arrives in the brain.
Feb
10
awarded  Suffrage
Feb
10
comment Is there a precise definition of “attitude”?
So, in the end, it is really just how much one likes something? I am still confused, because your citation says that it is not affect, but I have always thought "like" to be a form of affect - or is this assumption wrong?
Feb
10
comment Are colors real?
I think you are stopping too early. The same person will perceive the same wavelength as two different colors depending on many other visual properties of the scene (e.g. color and luminance contrast to surrounding colors, texture of the colored object) and his own expectations of what color the object should be.
Feb
10
comment How has geometry been applied in cognitive science?
Do you count topics like the psychology of visual perception and gestalt psychology, or do you mean only areas where geometry is used to study a cognitive process which is not directly related to geometry itself? Because the first would be a very wide area, while the second interpretation will give you a more interesting list.