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seen Jul 27 '12 at 2:41

Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
let us continue this discussion in chat
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ArtemKaznatcheev instead of the blog post promised, I added a new section to the question. In essence what I'm trying to convey is that unlike a human designed NN or chip where the wiring is completely pre-specified, in the brain, the genetic code does not seem to do this.
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
to whoever downvoted, could you comment on what you found wrong with my answer.
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@Preece I hope you have not missed the new section I added to the question: Why (I think) message type must be encoded in the message itself
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@Preece I guess I have some reading to do to understand how the LGN creates its topographical map. Any suggestions for a good source of reading material?
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@Preece Thanks for responding. Ok, here's where I keep getting confused: What if right after the green/red ganglion's firing, a blue/yellow ganglion right next to it fires...how does the upper region know its not another (or the previous) green/red one firing a second time?
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
Your description of the auditory system seems to be at odds with what I've read elsewhere, von Bekesy's Place Theory, which essentially says that the cochlea does a Fourier transform of the input pressure wave recorded by the eardrum. Also, I feel you have missed the problem I'm describing, here's another attempt: If red/blue/green are all converted to the same neural code, a rate coded spike stream, how do upper regions know which is which?
Jul
25
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington Thanks for the textbook links.
Jul
25
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington Point noted. I have been rereading Hubel and realized that I missed the bulk of the details during my earlier reading. BTW, this idea does not challenge the establishment, it is only a minor embellishment on established research.
Jul
23
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington The fact that a rate code is used does not in the slightest effect my claim. The musical instrument metaphor that I gave should make this clear.
Jul
23
comment Need good example of two domains involving different procedural knowledge yet sharing same high-level strategies
Did you include the Gauss anecdote when teaching the best way to add a sequence of natural numbers?
Jul
22
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ArtemKaznatcheev This question arose out of several deep meditations on qualia over the last few days and it is at the heart of my tentative explanation of qualia. If you don't like the background, simply ignore it. I'm sure a lot of people will find it very interesting and relevant.
Jul
22
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington I have read the relevant portions from David Hubel's book, Eye, Brain & Vision. It does contain a ton of delightful information. Hubel was among the first to record from individual neurons in V1. However, it looks like he and other neuroscientists have overlooked this aspect. Like I have said above, evidence for characteristic spike patterns would resolve a lot of questions regarding qualia. I'll give the details in a blog post.
Jul
22
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ArtemKaznatcheev Regarding getting meta information simply from the pattern of wiring, this is a good point and an easy mistake to make, which a few of my friends also raised. The answer is somewhat subtle, deserving of a full blog post. I'll put a link to it as soon as I've finished it.
Jul
22
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@ArtemKaznatcheev First, I must thank you for taking the time to try to answer my questions. But, I must protest against your claim that I'm looking for a confirmation of preconceived notions, since that is hardly a way to do science. It is just that I'm not convinced by either Dennett's or your evidence that there is no Cartesian theater.
Jul
22
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@Preece Off the top of my head this occured to me: what about people in a vegetative state? People who have suffered injuries to the prefrontal cortex and/or thalamus go into a coma or vegetative state, while being still alive.
Jul
21
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@ArtemKaznatcheev You keep insisting that I'm making the homunculus fallacy. My update is a clarification about this issue. The question proper which is in bold is a very valid question, and I think somebody with deep knowledge of neurobiology could provide an answer.
Jul
21
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@JeromyAnglim My update is of course not an answer. It is a clarification to those who keep insisting that my question makes the homunculus fallacy. Unfortunately since Dennett's Consciousness Explained the idea of a Cartesian theater and the homunculus fallacy have become strongly associated, and it requires some care to see that the former does not imply the latter.
Jul
20
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
Artem: IMO, there is a fallacy in your answer: When you say "the Whorf hypothesis is supported in the right visual field but not the left. In other words, when I present colours in one part of your visual field, you experience them one way and when I present them to the other then you experience them in a fundamentally different way." Doesn't your use of the phrase you experience suggest that ultimately there is one region (or subset of the brain) that does all the experiencing, while the rest of the brain does the lower level interpretation and presenting?
Jul
20
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
Artem: regarding the homunculus fallacy see my latest edit to the question.