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seen Jul 27 '12 at 2:41

Jul
23
answered Need good example of two domains involving different procedural knowledge yet sharing same high-level strategies
Jul
23
revised Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
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Jul
22
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ArtemKaznatcheev This question arose out of several deep meditations on qualia over the last few days and it is at the heart of my tentative explanation of qualia. If you don't like the background, simply ignore it. I'm sure a lot of people will find it very interesting and relevant.
Jul
22
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington I have read the relevant portions from David Hubel's book, Eye, Brain & Vision. It does contain a ton of delightful information. Hubel was among the first to record from individual neurons in V1. However, it looks like he and other neuroscientists have overlooked this aspect. Like I have said above, evidence for characteristic spike patterns would resolve a lot of questions regarding qualia. I'll give the details in a blog post.
Jul
22
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ArtemKaznatcheev Regarding getting meta information simply from the pattern of wiring, this is a good point and an easy mistake to make, which a few of my friends also raised. The answer is somewhat subtle, deserving of a full blog post. I'll put a link to it as soon as I've finished it.
Jul
22
revised Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
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Jul
22
asked Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
Jul
22
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@ArtemKaznatcheev First, I must thank you for taking the time to try to answer my questions. But, I must protest against your claim that I'm looking for a confirmation of preconceived notions, since that is hardly a way to do science. It is just that I'm not convinced by either Dennett's or your evidence that there is no Cartesian theater.
Jul
22
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@Preece Off the top of my head this occured to me: what about people in a vegetative state? People who have suffered injuries to the prefrontal cortex and/or thalamus go into a coma or vegetative state, while being still alive.
Jul
22
revised Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
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Jul
21
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@ArtemKaznatcheev You keep insisting that I'm making the homunculus fallacy. My update is a clarification about this issue. The question proper which is in bold is a very valid question, and I think somebody with deep knowledge of neurobiology could provide an answer.
Jul
21
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@JeromyAnglim My update is of course not an answer. It is a clarification to those who keep insisting that my question makes the homunculus fallacy. Unfortunately since Dennett's Consciousness Explained the idea of a Cartesian theater and the homunculus fallacy have become strongly associated, and it requires some care to see that the former does not imply the latter.
Jul
20
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
Artem: IMO, there is a fallacy in your answer: When you say "the Whorf hypothesis is supported in the right visual field but not the left. In other words, when I present colours in one part of your visual field, you experience them one way and when I present them to the other then you experience them in a fundamentally different way." Doesn't your use of the phrase you experience suggest that ultimately there is one region (or subset of the brain) that does all the experiencing, while the rest of the brain does the lower level interpretation and presenting?
Jul
20
awarded  Commentator
Jul
20
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
Artem: regarding the homunculus fallacy see my latest edit to the question.
Jul
20
revised Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
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Jul
20
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
In Dennett's own words: "...its as if you entered a factory and there's all this humming machinery and there's nobody home, there's no watchman, no supervisor, no boss, its all just machinery...". My guess is that he's saying such things because controversy generates more publicity.
Jul
20
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
To a Martian observing a human army/corporation/bureaucracy at work, it would appear that activity is highly distributed over all the individual soldiers/employees/bureaucrats without any coordination by a single general/ceo/president. What you say applies to a nation during peace time, when the 'invisible hand' (postulated by Adam Smith) does all the coordination, but it should be obvious that our brains are organized as a hierarchy with a single self (only rarely as in multiple personality disorder do multiple selfs in a single brain arise). I just don't understand why Dennett denies this.
Jul
20
revised Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
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Jul
20
revised Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
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