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awarded  Nice Question
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
let us continue this discussion in chat
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ArtemKaznatcheev instead of the blog post promised, I added a new section to the question. In essence what I'm trying to convey is that unlike a human designed NN or chip where the wiring is completely pre-specified, in the brain, the genetic code does not seem to do this.
Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
to whoever downvoted, could you comment on what you found wrong with my answer.
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awarded  Supporter
Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@Preece I hope you have not missed the new section I added to the question: Why (I think) message type must be encoded in the message itself
Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@Preece I guess I have some reading to do to understand how the LGN creates its topographical map. Any suggestions for a good source of reading material?
Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@Preece Thanks for responding. Ok, here's where I keep getting confused: What if right after the green/red ganglion's firing, a blue/yellow ganglion right next to it fires...how does the upper region know its not another (or the previous) green/red one firing a second time?
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Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
Your description of the auditory system seems to be at odds with what I've read elsewhere, von Bekesy's Place Theory, which essentially says that the cochlea does a Fourier transform of the input pressure wave recorded by the eardrum. Also, I feel you have missed the problem I'm describing, here's another attempt: If red/blue/green are all converted to the same neural code, a rate coded spike stream, how do upper regions know which is which?
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answered Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
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revised Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
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revised Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
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Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington Thanks for the textbook links.
Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington Point noted. I have been rereading Hubel and realized that I missed the bulk of the details during my earlier reading. BTW, this idea does not challenge the establishment, it is only a minor embellishment on established research.
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revised Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
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Jul
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comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@ChuckSherrington The fact that a rate code is used does not in the slightest effect my claim. The musical instrument metaphor that I gave should make this clear.
Jul
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comment Need good example of two domains involving different procedural knowledge yet sharing same high-level strategies
Did you include the Gauss anecdote when teaching the best way to add a sequence of natural numbers?