158 reputation
6
bio website stoicfury.com
location Silicon Valley
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Apr 1 at 19:44

Your friendly neighborhood Philosophy Mod. :)

Research Psychologist and HF Engineer at NASA.
Background in Psychology, Philosophy, and Computer Science.

Interests / areas of study:
artificial intelligence, linguistics, natural language processing, evolutionary psychology, persuasion, perception, developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, perception/phenomenology, Kant, Hume, Buddha.

The Future Is Ours


Mar
31
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
24
awarded  Scholar
Apr
24
accepted Can experience alter one's preferences for beauty?
Apr
19
comment Can experience alter one's preferences for beauty?
@Jeff - Yes, this is a reference request for literature to support this...
Apr
19
awarded  Student
Apr
19
asked Can experience alter one's preferences for beauty?
Feb
5
awarded  Editor
Feb
5
revised Why are people inclined to praise or fear the unknown?
belief is not the correct word to use here, fatih is more appropriate
Feb
5
suggested suggested edit on Why are people inclined to praise or fear the unknown?
Feb
4
comment Is variation in human brain size related to mental functioning?
This is a common misconception. While there are many variables to consider, the raw amount of brain matter available to use for processing does make a difference when it comes to general intelligence. Ratio has nothing to do with it (correlation != causation); Chimpanzees for example have a worse "ratio" than humans and can outperform college students on certain memory tasks. That said, brain size taken at the exclusion of the many other factors involved (neuronal wiring, experience, plastiticy, etc.) has relatively low predictive power, but in the end — size does matter.
Jan
26
comment Why is recognition easier than recall?
+1 Pattern matching is much faster than iterative searching, even though in principle they are the same kind of iterative search. The thing about recognition is that you store a piece of data with a fairly precise "tag" (a visual or auditory association, for example) and thus you more rapidly identify the memory because often only that stimulus is linked with that stored information. Recall involves the same search method but without the helpful associative tag narrowing down the options.
Jan
26
awarded  Supporter
Jan
19
awarded  Autobiographer