3,902 reputation
1233
bio website chil.rice.edu/jzemla
location Houston, TX
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen yesterday

Mar
15
comment What are some of the drawbacks to probabilistic models of cognition?
Griffiths et al in the same issue is a good counterpart to this article: psychology.adelaide.edu.au/personalpages/staff/amyperfors/…
Mar
7
comment Is it a good idea to play an instrument while studying? If so, what are the benefits?
In support of the "we can't really multitask" claim, readers may wish to google the "PRP effect" or read a book like amazon.com/Multitasking-Mind-Cognitive-Models-Architectures/dp/… . In fact, it's hard for me to think of any situation in which doing two tasks at once aids performance on a single task better than doing that task alone. But it's an interesting topic...
Mar
7
comment Is it a good idea to play an instrument while studying? If so, what are the benefits?
i've "heard" it, but am not aware of any literature that actually supports that claim. i think it's just an urban legend, but would love to be proved wrong. perhaps you could add some references to your question?
Mar
4
revised Can response time be incorporated into signal detection theory?
added citation
Mar
4
suggested suggested edit on Can response time be incorporated into signal detection theory?
Mar
2
comment Does super-intelligence necessary lead to consciousness, self awareness, freewill or emotion
Excellent answer-- it's great to see people putting in the time to answer questions at a level of detail that really answers the question thoroughly and provides references for further research
Mar
2
comment What concepts of perception should designers be aware of when designing?
@Ryan if you know of specific journal articles that might relate to this topic, check out this thread to potentially access them for free: meta.cogsci.stackexchange.com/a/205/55
Mar
1
comment Why is it common for people to default to a single causal source to explain new phenomena?
@Comptrol no i think there's a valid question in here, but I think the phenomenon is much more general than you give it credit for. Research on causal reasoning tends to show that once people attribute a cause to an event, they tend to discount other possible causes. So the question then becomes, why do conspiracy nuts think X is the most likely cause?
Mar
1
comment Why aren't sleep measures consistently measured as mediators/moderators of cognitive performance?
Yes, I agree with almost everything you say; I think I just did a poor job of wording my argument. I'll try to edit my post to be more clear, but you bring up some good points as well-- maybe you should delete your comments and turn them into an answer?
Feb
29
comment Why aren't sleep measures consistently measured as mediators/moderators of cognitive performance?
@Preece no. as an example, let's suppose i put a test online to collect data from any participant who is willing. those who take the test voluntarily likely share certain characteristics-- perhaps they are more inquisitive than the population as a whole. in this case my sample is biased, because inquisitiveness is not normally distributed in my sample with respect to the population.
Feb
29
suggested suggested edit on Why aren't sleep measures consistently measured as mediators/moderators of cognitive performance?
Feb
29
answered Why aren't sleep measures consistently measured as mediators/moderators of cognitive performance?
Feb
28
comment How can I create computer based psychology experiments using OS X?
To note: PsychoPy doesn't require you to write code from scratch, but its capabilities are greatly expanded by doing so. (Disclosure: I haven't actually used it).
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
@rob they actually contain 'logic', as you say. if they simply responded to hedonic stimuli, they would not respond to a CS. And indeed, this logic codes for 'future behavior': studies show that firing dopamine neurons do not simply reflect the current value of the stimulus, but the discounted sum of all future values. Wikipedia TD-learning for more info.
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
@rob try meta.cogsci.stackexchange.com/a/205/55
Feb
27
revised How does the brain act on the information gained via eye saccades?
was not my response
Feb
27
suggested suggested edit on How does the brain act on the information gained via eye saccades?
Feb
23
revised When is higher confidence predictive of less accuracy?
added graph
Feb
23
comment When is higher confidence predictive of less accuracy?
@JeromyAnglim that was my first thought too (re: ceiling effects, regression to the mean), though they discuss this in attempt to rule out that explanation. i think there's still some room for debate, but it does have 1000+ citations, so a lot of people seem to buy into it, for whatever that's worth.
Feb
23
answered When is higher confidence predictive of less accuracy?