3,992 reputation
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bio website chil.rice.edu/jzemla
location Houston, TX
age
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jul 22 at 19:58

Nov
23
revised Is performance reducible to brain activity in an unambiguous way?
typo
Nov
22
comment Ignoring minority while generalizing about a group, any theoretical reference?
good point. you're assuming ∀ instead of ∃, but the reality is ambiguous
Nov
22
comment What's the name of the quantifying preference for visual stimulus by varying size or distance as compared to a reference task?
my first thought is, if you're going to ask them which picture they would prefer to look at, why not just ask them which they prefer? it's a much more direct measure. i also have doubts that people would switch at all. mostly, i have no reason to believe the size of the photos correlates at all with my actual preference. of course i'd love to be proved wrong...
Nov
22
awarded  Necromancer
Nov
21
comment What's the name of the quantifying preference for visual stimulus by varying size or distance as compared to a reference task?
Sorry Andy, no keyword suggestions. I would start at google scholar. More importantly, do you have any reason to believe this measure actually exists? It doesn't sound like a very reliable or valid way to measure preference.
Nov
21
comment Ignoring minority while generalizing about a group, any theoretical reference?
this is a good question, but i think you need to narrow down your interests a bit. you seem to be asking "why do people stereotype?" there is a huge literature on stereotyping that addresses this question. perhaps try to do some research and narrow down your question.
Nov
21
comment What's the name of the quantifying preference for visual stimulus by varying size or distance as compared to a reference task?
Can you find an example in the literature? I have never heard of this before. If it's not used by anyone, it probably doesn't have a name.
Nov
20
awarded  Revival
Nov
20
comment Obey any command given suddenly, as in the Jumping Frenchmen of Maine
fictional examples are not real examples. most of this is conjecture. no sources sites. no research effort (wikipedia "jumping frenchmen of maine"). vote to close, NARQ.
Nov
20
comment Problems with using personal feedback to motivate participation in an online psychological experiment?
3) yes, feedback can engage attention. whether that mitigates attrition in your experiment is unclear.
Nov
20
comment Problems with using personal feedback to motivate participation in an online psychological experiment?
Interesting question, but I don't think it's possible to answer with the information given. If you give us a detailed explanation of the experiment and what you hope to find, perhaps we can help. My intuitions: 1) is there any reason to suspect this is unethical? 2) people might try to change their answers to match feedback, even if they don't know how the feedback was derived. this in confusing though, because you say feedback is only given at the end of the experiment. so i'm not sure how that would help your cause.
Nov
20
answered Have the abilities of John Lorber's patients with limited cortical mass been further evaluated in adulthood?
Nov
19
comment How repeatable are cognitive science findings within the same individual?
I suppose you could say that, but no one actually does. It's just as arbitrary as saying "There are two types of experiments: those that study the effects of aging on memory, and those that don't." Sure it's true, but it's meaningless.
Nov
19
comment What articles use structural equation modelling in a meta-analytic context to model mediation?
Welcome to cogsci.SE, and many thanks for your well-thought-out contribution! I hope you'll stick around and ask/answer some other questions that arise. Also for future reference: if you're familiar with LaTeX (MathTeX), you can use it to format math equations in your posts
Nov
19
answered How repeatable are cognitive science findings within the same individual?
Nov
18
revised Are there professional cognitive science test subjects?
added citations and tweaked link text
Nov
18
comment Are there professional cognitive science test subjects?
classic study on expertise: Ericsson, K. A., Krampe, R. T., & Tesch-Römer, C. (1993). The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological review, 100(3), 363. syllabus.byu.edu/uploads/h52kB4gCLyQP.pdf
Nov
17
revised Why do you sometimes write down one word while actually intending to write another?
edited body
Nov
17
answered Is there a random walk theory that can account for situations with more than two choices?
Nov
17
reviewed Leave Open How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?