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seen Aug 29 at 13:27

May
8
comment Why low audio frequencies seem to detune after an intense workout?
This might be an effect of sound-conducting fluids in the ear canal.
May
1
comment Are there any negative effects from hypnotherapy for bipolar disorder?
I feel almost required to ask: has searching for this other places given you any leads? You say you've been reading up on hypnotism, but have you checked to see if anyone has tried hypnosis for bipolar disorder already?
Apr
8
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
And lastly, while I'm sure many of us would enjoy sitting down and talk with you more about this, it sounds like you would be more at home either in the Chat, or on a discussion-based website community (such as Reddit, etc), rather than here - we try to stick with the specific question/answer format. So feel free to bring any questions you have to us, but the ongoing updates aren't really our style, sorry.
Apr
8
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
That said, please, be very careful (even if you think you are, please please please). Dopamine is playing with fire, and not just with the brain - I'm sure you've seen the problems with l-DOPA, but there's a hidden danger: be very careful of your kidney(s). They do a lot of work behind the scenes, and too much protein especially can really hit them hard (as well as pretty much any other drug, though some are more damaging/dangerous than others).
Apr
8
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
You mentioned that you find the level of engagement we're giving your question surprising - it's relatively uncommon for people to engage beyond the first question and clarifying comments (if even that).
Apr
5
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
There are a lot more (non-typical) stimulants that may have an effect as well: (ar)modafinil, xanthine-derivatives, ampakines, phenyl-derivatives, and more. The buck doesn't stop at classic CNS stimulants!
Apr
5
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
That said, there is more to my answer than simply describing symptoms. It's a bit more mixed in there than I'd intended, but as best as I can I tried to give out a couple ideas - I have no idea if they'll work for you, but maybe give them a try? Up to you, but I wish you luck with your search, and I wish I could help more!
Apr
5
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
@awalley - I'm very sorry if I came off as antagonistic - this is a slightly sore point for me, as I've known many people who've only seen the show Prison Break, and so assume that LLI is this great, awesome-all-the-time, thing. The wording of your question poked that button, and for that I'm very sorry. I absolutely understand the impulse to get inside another person's head - I feel this myself on a daily basis; people are so interesting! I hope you can forgive this random Internet stranger...
Apr
4
comment Inducing long term low latent inhibition
Related: cogsci.stackexchange.com/questions/772/…
Apr
1
comment How exactly are socionics and MBTI different?
One was developed in the US, one was developed in the former Soviet bloc, and both are based on Carl Jung's archetypes? (tongue in cheek aside, nice question, and I'm interested in the answer. While a wiki search might answer this, having a more coherent compare/contrast would likely be helpful)
Apr
1
comment Why do people suddenly look back if you look at them for a while?
While I agree that it's an illusion of 'supernaturality' (I see what you're saying and agree with you), I have a slightly different experience with my own self-observation: I've found that very often people do not consciously perceive another person looking at them in their periphery - rather, there is a signal, in/to the consciousness, that 'something' is happening in the periphery. Many people will look around for the person staring at them, rather than looking directly at them the first time - indicating to me that they don't have immediate knowledge, only an indication.
Mar
31
comment Why do people suddenly look back if you look at them for a while?
(a) and (b) seem to show that this isn't always an illusion...
Mar
29
comment How long could Henry Molaison keep his memory of the present?
The Wikipedia page for Short-term memory references H.M. specifically, and gives the (uncited) length of 'up to 30 seconds' (though I should say I have no idea whether your first example is short-term, or the second is. I just don't know, sorry).
Mar
28
comment How long could Henry Molaison keep his memory of the present?
Might be related to the span of short-term memory in general? Not sure...
Mar
28
comment What brain regions are activated when a dream is remembered?
Don't know why you were downvoted; I like the question. I think it's a bit unclear what you're asking specifically (the first bold sentence is convoluted, and the second isn't a proper sentence in the first place). It seems like what you're really asking is - can we discern whether or not a dream will be "recallable"/"remember-able" after waking, based on neural activity just-prior-to and just-after waking. And while I can't answer that myself, it's an interesting question!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
seems, yes, though most of this is speculation, haha. As for your next question, it's a good one, and one I can't answer. I'll definitely upvote it if you ask though!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
It's also worth adding that the suspension of disbelief is a gradient, not an on-off thing. We can be all levels of suspicious/disbelieving. So the suspension of disbelief may only be half of it - person B would also have to acknowledge the possibility of a result (even if they don't expect a result, they are to some degree [more would be better] open to its occurrence). Most of this seems to come down to expectations, personality, and the ability to say, "this doesn't fit my current model of the universe, but that's okay".
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
Excellent example! Unfortunately, now we're getting into more complex/fuzzy areas. In your example, person A attempts the ritual without expectation as to the result - whereas person B attempts the ritual with strong expectations as to the outcome. Could B, the same person B with the same prior knowledge, instead perform the ritual with the (to them, inaccurate) expectation of success? That is, can B suspend their disbelief for the length of the ritual? If possible (and I suspect this is personality-dependent), I see no reason why person B couldn't also create the same outcome.
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
@svidgen while I suspect you are asking with the specific context of taking a placebo pill, as mentioned in what's answer you'll find that undergoing rituals is well-documented for producing altered states of consciousness (yoga, shamanic practices, religious rituals, etc). Or, for a more modern/relevant example, performing exercise for mood regulation. At some point, it's not self-suggestion or self-deception: it's a true belief that doing a certain thing will produce certain results (whether or not that thing is a self-induced 'placebo' effect, or a biochemical effect). a.k.a magic!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
I suspect that the key difference between the two is one of agency, intent, or awareness - with self-suggestion having much more self-awareness than self-deception (which, by definition, includes a lack of self-awareness). I...doubt that that distinction is helpful though, sorry.