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Dec
26
comment Is there a “foreplay” equivalent, priming activity for thinking or conversation?
Hmm...So I found a couple papers on the subject. At this point I'm not sure what your question has become. However, it seems that such activities are so wide-spread that they touch literally every human interaction (also, consider that such activities are likely unconsciously performed in many cases). This subject could potentially be a goldmine of research, if you pursued it.
Dec
24
comment Does anxiety produce adrenaline or does adrenaline make the person anxious?
"It makes sense but it is an infinite cycle. What is the false (and why), or if both are true then how does it ends?" - Both, and it's only an infinite cycle if you don't have a parasympathetic nervous system to modulate that adrenal response. But I don't have the references to make this an answer.
Dec
21
comment Is there a “foreplay” equivalent, priming activity for thinking or conversation?
I see two classes of situations here: 1) where there's an actual inhibition on one person's part, and 2) where people are in different states of mind (one is happy, the other sad). For the first, an icebreaker is needed to relax/ease their anxieties. For the second, 'conversation foreplay' is necessary to align the cognitive states of the participants. Without such an alignment activity, it would be very difficult to feel/process sympathy, empathy, or other socio-emotional connections. But this is just a theory on my part.
Dec
20
comment Is there a “foreplay” equivalent, priming activity for thinking or conversation?
Also, I'll add that we're analog (signal) creatures, not discrete (aka digital) ones. When we do things, we are not on/off. We have to build up energy to overcome an activation barrier (this isn't just on the neuronal level, this paradigm exists all over). So for many people, a digital (or near-digital) shift to a different state can be very uncomfortable.
Dec
20
comment Is there a “foreplay” equivalent, priming activity for thinking or conversation?
That's a different question: "what priming activities exist" vs "why is priming needed in the first place". Anyone could have any reason for social discomfort around strangers. Hell, with "stranger danger", kids are taught to be afraid of strangers. At the core, it's fear/anxiety, regardless of the cognitive reason behind it. But that's just for social discomfort. Turning the question around and using your foreplay example, what is "the ice being broken" there?
Dec
20
comment How does one study the effect of a dietary supplement on cognition?
There is a bit of information (and linked studies) at the Wikipedia page for Vinpocetine. Looks like a serious lack of information in general, but they have some basic information like half-life and bio-availability.
Dec
19
comment Is there a “foreplay” equivalent, priming activity for thinking or conversation?
Often groups will use Icebreakers to ease conversation.
Dec
19
comment How does one study the effect of a dietary supplement on cognition?
Though most likely the lack of studies is the result of difficulties with performing well-controlled, longitudinal studies for common dietary supplements that marketers can make more money off of without scientific backing...(these statements are not FDA-approved).
Dec
19
comment How does one study the effect of a dietary supplement on cognition?
I think there is an issue here, in that "real psychoactive drugs" aren't meant to be taken for extended time periods (I mean, you can...). Whereas dietary supplements (and other 'medicines') are meant to be taken over an extended time-period to effect a change in self/personality/life after time. They can take time to build up in the body (think SSRI's, also).
Dec
19
comment Can we stop the brain from processing a particular task?
@H.Muster Certainly; however, I wouldn't be surprised to find that OCD is related to a malfunction of whatever causes that feeling of discomfort. Moreover, I suspect the OCD literature contains more resources for cognitive intervention techniques, in general, than other areas.
Dec
17
comment Can we stop the brain from processing a particular task?
"prevent the uncomfortable feeling of "having an unsolved task"?" -- you may try looking into research on Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD).
Dec
14
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Nov
30
comment How does the brain process concurrent visual or sensory data?
Your question is unclear... are you asking the difference between seeing something and visualizing that same thing? Or are you asking about attention and sensory inputs and how they coordinate on (un-)/(pre-)/conscious levels? You may control multiple things, but if you are doing it consciously (i.e. paying attention), I would suspect it's still multiplexed action...
Nov
10
comment Why a person may have a temptation to do something unrelated when doing especially important thing?
Related: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procrastination - tl;dr most likely some sort of anxiety
Nov
9
comment How does the mind build a model of reality?
I like this, but I think you've got too much going on at once here. I see at least 3 different questions (roughly the bolded parts) - you may get better results by splitting them up, even if they have overlapping background information.
Nov
9
comment How does language change the understanding of a complex concept?
Related: Stanford researcher Lera Boroditsky's talk 'How Language Shapes Thought' - fora.tv/2010/10/26/Lera_Boroditsky_How_Language_Shapes_Thought
Nov
5
comment Is happiness a result of cognitive or a side effect of neurobiological processes?
Also, you have two questions here - it may result in better/more answers if you were to split them into two questions: I'm interested if there's any research indicating if different mental states, for example mind wandering, are caused by something that changes within the brain? and As such, is it plausible to say that suicidal ideation is a biological marker of depression, just as mind wandering may be a biological marker of unhappiness?
Nov
5
comment Is happiness a result of cognitive or a side effect of neurobiological processes?
"arises naturally as a cognitive process, completely independent of biology" - so you know, to my knowledge this is a pretty controversial statement: the generally accepted belief in neuroscience (again, to my knowledge) is that everything is based in biology/chemistry (bioelectrochemistry, to be precise).
Nov
5
revised Should always selecting the same response on the IOWA Gambling Test result in a good value?
formatting, spelling, grammar
Nov
5
suggested suggested edit on Should always selecting the same response on the IOWA Gambling Test result in a good value?