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Jul
31
comment Have humans always had problems with motivation and laziness?
Oh, absolutely agreed. There's literally no context to the information. I merely wanted to point out the possible, if ultimately unprovable, existence of a feedback loop - using your example: people reading a text about the decline of laboriousness may seek out and propagate examples of people not being laborious (confirmation bias), and thus we get more texts about the (apparent) decline of laboriousness - regardless of actual labor being done.
Jul
31
comment Have humans always had problems with motivation and laziness?
I agree with what and others, in that the texts primarily represent what people wrote about. But!...the texts also represent what the people who read those texts thought about. It's not just the producers, but also the consumers, that we must consider.
Jul
23
awarded  Talkative
Jul
23
revised Reading recommendations for getting acquainted with cognitive behavioral therapy
removed personal details
Jul
23
comment Reading recommendations for getting acquainted with cognitive behavioral therapy
Hi there! Generally list-type questions are hard to answer. Can you tell us more about what you're looking for? That is, are you looking for a general overview textbook, or for something more like a workbook with exercises, etc?
Jul
23
suggested approved edit on Reading recommendations for getting acquainted with cognitive behavioral therapy
Jul
18
comment Neural Mechanisms of Accumulation and Triggering
I would guess that, at a certain point, a threshold is passed and what looks like a binary switch is triggered. But at what point is 'the switch flipped'?
Jul
18
revised Neural Mechanisms of Accumulation and Triggering
edit with new example for clarity of question
Jul
18
answered What does Lumosity's Flexibility measure?
Jul
18
asked Neural Mechanisms of Accumulation and Triggering
Jun
19
comment Can we be conscious of our dreams?
As user1406647 mentions, the topic of Lucid Dreaming is related.
Jun
19
revised Can we be conscious of our dreams?
fixed grammar, removed references to 'subconscious' (unclear terminology)
Jun
19
suggested approved edit on Can we be conscious of our dreams?
Jun
10
comment How to create a course that will give you synesthesia?
that's a much better question; the original question seemed more like a poll (particularly given your comment asking for opinions). I would agree that asking for "best-fit" complements re: synaesthesia is a relevant question (I removed my downvote). The only thing I'd say is that you still have lots of different questions in the formal question body, and that can make it difficult to know which question is most important to you. Otherwise, nice question! :)
Jun
10
comment How to create a course that will give you synesthesia?
You have two questions here, one is a good fit for the StackExchange format, one is not. You ask, in essence, "What is the best way to induce functional synaesthesia?" This is an interesting question, and I'd be interesting in learning the answer myself! Unfortunately, the other question, and the one after which the formal question is titled, is "What kinda of synaesthesia would a subjective person prefer?" This is not a good-fit question - it is subjective and doesn't have a definitive answer. I would recommend removing that section re-titling the formal question.
May
29
comment Why do our senses evoke different subjective experiences
That's the thing, though - there are different parts of the neocortex that process input signals from different sensory areas. After that, we get into the Binding Problem of: 'How, after processing the sensory signals, are those signals aggregated (or bound) together into a coherent experience-process?' - Note that this doesn't assume that we're aggregating the actual signals into a single representative signal. It may be the case that the act of processing the signals is what creates the phenomenon itself - we just don't know.
May
29
comment Most common cognitive biases?
Although it doesn't give the most common ones, here is a list of multiple cognitive biases in different areas.
May
29
comment Why do our senses evoke different subjective experiences
With your edit, I'm now a little confused as to your question. You admit that different sensory systems will output different signals, but your question is predicated on the idea that these signals will be processed by 'the same neurons' (when our sensor systems are technically the same neurons). I'm not claiming that the most outer part of the sensor systems work in the same way - are you assuming that the inner sensory processing systems are working the same way as each other?
May
28
comment Why do our senses evoke different subjective experiences
technically the same neurons that just get excited by different stuff - I disagree with this... Sounds will excite different neurons, and will get processed differently, than those excited by sight. In other words, yes, they're both 'just' electrical impulses, but they're completely different impulses that originate in different locations. They may activate overlapping areas throughout the course of processing, but they are quantitatively different.
May
1
comment Why do some people seem to disregard the choice of doing nothing (The Zero Choice)?
I came across the Wikipedia article for the Anchoring Effect and was going to add it as a new answer, but then I noticed you had already referenced it as the 'focusing effect' and I had somehow simply missed that. Thanks again for the good answer!