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 Yearling
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Mar
31
comment Why do people suddenly look back if you look at them for a while?
(a) and (b) seem to show that this isn't always an illusion...
Mar
29
comment How long could Henry Molaison keep his memory of the present?
The Wikipedia page for Short-term memory references H.M. specifically, and gives the (uncited) length of 'up to 30 seconds' (though I should say I have no idea whether your first example is short-term, or the second is. I just don't know, sorry).
Mar
28
comment How long could Henry Molaison keep his memory of the present?
Might be related to the span of short-term memory in general? Not sure...
Mar
28
comment What brain regions are activated when a dream is remembered?
Don't know why you were downvoted; I like the question. I think it's a bit unclear what you're asking specifically (the first bold sentence is convoluted, and the second isn't a proper sentence in the first place). It seems like what you're really asking is - can we discern whether or not a dream will be "recallable"/"remember-able" after waking, based on neural activity just-prior-to and just-after waking. And while I can't answer that myself, it's an interesting question!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
seems, yes, though most of this is speculation, haha. As for your next question, it's a good one, and one I can't answer. I'll definitely upvote it if you ask though!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
It's also worth adding that the suspension of disbelief is a gradient, not an on-off thing. We can be all levels of suspicious/disbelieving. So the suspension of disbelief may only be half of it - person B would also have to acknowledge the possibility of a result (even if they don't expect a result, they are to some degree [more would be better] open to its occurrence). Most of this seems to come down to expectations, personality, and the ability to say, "this doesn't fit my current model of the universe, but that's okay".
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
Excellent example! Unfortunately, now we're getting into more complex/fuzzy areas. In your example, person A attempts the ritual without expectation as to the result - whereas person B attempts the ritual with strong expectations as to the outcome. Could B, the same person B with the same prior knowledge, instead perform the ritual with the (to them, inaccurate) expectation of success? That is, can B suspend their disbelief for the length of the ritual? If possible (and I suspect this is personality-dependent), I see no reason why person B couldn't also create the same outcome.
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
@svidgen while I suspect you are asking with the specific context of taking a placebo pill, as mentioned in what's answer you'll find that undergoing rituals is well-documented for producing altered states of consciousness (yoga, shamanic practices, religious rituals, etc). Or, for a more modern/relevant example, performing exercise for mood regulation. At some point, it's not self-suggestion or self-deception: it's a true belief that doing a certain thing will produce certain results (whether or not that thing is a self-induced 'placebo' effect, or a biochemical effect). a.k.a magic!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
I suspect that the key difference between the two is one of agency, intent, or awareness - with self-suggestion having much more self-awareness than self-deception (which, by definition, includes a lack of self-awareness). I...doubt that that distinction is helpful though, sorry.
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
I'd give you all the upvotes if I could - this may not be directly relevant to the question being asked, but it's excellent accompanying information. It also opens up an interesting subject - the role of ritual in activating the placebo response (i.e. belief/perception), especially in 'primitive' societies/cultures. The OP might find the answer to his question researching that subject.
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
@svidgen What, to you, is the difference between self-suggestion[ of a belief] and self-deception?
Mar
10
comment Why do some days feel fast and others feel slow?
Definitely related to time perception
Jan
28
comment Are there physical techniques to relieve eye strain?
Possibly relevant Wikipedia link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_eye_chart
Jan
27
comment What is depersonalization and derealization disorder from a neurological point of view?
I think it's important to differentiate between "DP/DR" and "DP/DR Disorder". Dissociation (in the form of DP/DR) can be a powerful coping mechanism (and healthy at that - e.g. some meditations). Not to mention, the label "DP/DR" gives no indication as to the "quality" of the dissociation, nor the degree to which one becomes dissociated with a particular aspect of self/reality. That said, good question!
Jan
27
comment Perception of time as a function of age
I have no sources for this, but I heard it put thusly: as one ages, each 'moment', compared to the 'total number of moments' in one's life, is smaller time-wise. So, as N increases, 1/N decreases in size. Again, no sources, but it's a neat idea.
Jan
24
comment Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?
It's definitely on the right track! However, I also think that it should include more information on 'why' we feel disgust (more than 'protection' from substances - why feel disgust when watching a gross video?), the 'how' of feeling disgust (apparently specifically processed by the insula). And definitely more info on how desensitization works. But I agree with you - this is a start in the right direction!
Jan
24
comment Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?
Truthfully? Because this is a non-answer. It's very easy to say that nausea and vomiting are caused by 'Disgust', but that says nothing about what 'Disgust' itself is, or why we feel 'Disgust' when we're presented with those stimuli.
Jan
24
comment Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?
It's an okay start, but I think the OP is looking more of a neuro/cog-neuro answer to this. Perhaps summarize 'The neural basis of disgust' section from Wikipedia for a more relevant answer?
Jan
18
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Nov
4
comment Is there a relationship between schizophrenia and genius
Also, there are also correlations between increased intelligence and drug use (to counter-set the point of drug use and schizophrenia being correlated).