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Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
@svidgen while I suspect you are asking with the specific context of taking a placebo pill, as mentioned in what's answer you'll find that undergoing rituals is well-documented for producing altered states of consciousness (yoga, shamanic practices, religious rituals, etc). Or, for a more modern/relevant example, performing exercise for mood regulation. At some point, it's not self-suggestion or self-deception: it's a true belief that doing a certain thing will produce certain results (whether or not that thing is a self-induced 'placebo' effect, or a biochemical effect). a.k.a magic!
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
I suspect that the key difference between the two is one of agency, intent, or awareness - with self-suggestion having much more self-awareness than self-deception (which, by definition, includes a lack of self-awareness). I...doubt that that distinction is helpful though, sorry.
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
I'd give you all the upvotes if I could - this may not be directly relevant to the question being asked, but it's excellent accompanying information. It also opens up an interesting subject - the role of ritual in activating the placebo response (i.e. belief/perception), especially in 'primitive' societies/cultures. The OP might find the answer to his question researching that subject.
Mar
21
comment Can a person “self-induce” the placebo effect?
@svidgen What, to you, is the difference between self-suggestion[ of a belief] and self-deception?
Mar
10
comment Why do some days feel fast and others feel slow?
Definitely related to time perception
Jan
28
comment Are there physical techniques to relieve eye strain?
Possibly relevant Wikipedia link: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tibetan_eye_chart
Jan
27
comment What is depersonalization and derealization disorder from a neurological point of view?
I think it's important to differentiate between "DP/DR" and "DP/DR Disorder". Dissociation (in the form of DP/DR) can be a powerful coping mechanism (and healthy at that - e.g. some meditations). Not to mention, the label "DP/DR" gives no indication as to the "quality" of the dissociation, nor the degree to which one becomes dissociated with a particular aspect of self/reality. That said, good question!
Jan
27
comment Perception of time as a function of age
I have no sources for this, but I heard it put thusly: as one ages, each 'moment', compared to the 'total number of moments' in one's life, is smaller time-wise. So, as N increases, 1/N decreases in size. Again, no sources, but it's a neat idea.
Jan
24
comment Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?
It's definitely on the right track! However, I also think that it should include more information on 'why' we feel disgust (more than 'protection' from substances - why feel disgust when watching a gross video?), the 'how' of feeling disgust (apparently specifically processed by the insula). And definitely more info on how desensitization works. But I agree with you - this is a start in the right direction!
Jan
24
comment Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?
Truthfully? Because this is a non-answer. It's very easy to say that nausea and vomiting are caused by 'Disgust', but that says nothing about what 'Disgust' itself is, or why we feel 'Disgust' when we're presented with those stimuli.
Jan
24
comment Why does the the sight of gore causes nausea, vomiting and/or fainting?
It's an okay start, but I think the OP is looking more of a neuro/cog-neuro answer to this. Perhaps summarize 'The neural basis of disgust' section from Wikipedia for a more relevant answer?
Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
comment Is there a relationship between schizophrenia and genius
Also, there are also correlations between increased intelligence and drug use (to counter-set the point of drug use and schizophrenia being correlated).
Nov
4
comment Is there a relationship between schizophrenia and genius
Sounds like you're more interested in mental disorders and intelligence (not just schizophrenia). One factor is that aspects of mental disorders can contribute to creative intelligence. For example, a disordered brain may produce more lateral pattern matching (connecting disparate phenomena), which can in certain circumstances be considered as increased creativity. Or another example, consider latent inhibition (how capable is the brain of ignoring already-processed stimuli). So there are certainly aspects that can contribute to both mental disorder and "measures of intelligence".
Aug
26
comment Derived knowledge from periodicity of harmonic motion?
It's a rabbit hole, and I keep getting smaller....
Aug
26
comment Derived knowledge from periodicity of harmonic motion?
Mostly happened without realizing it - answers only create more questions!
Aug
26
asked Derived knowledge from periodicity of harmonic motion?
Aug
23
comment What is the latest research on dermatillomania and is there a correlation with masochism?
From my understanding, it's an anxiety response - a repetitive, absorptive activity that can be undertaken at any time in any place. Very soothing, but in a harmful way. As for why she picked it up from her mother? That's classic observational learning in children when trying to find a way to deal with a situation - in this case a genetic predisposition for extreme anxiety/panic.
Aug
23
comment What is the latest research on dermatillomania and is there a correlation with masochism?
Anecdotal of course, but I had a friend who did this because she had picked it up from her mom. No idea why the mother did/does it though.
Aug
14
comment Neural Processes of Inducing Flow
This is an impressive answer, and I love the second paragraph - I've read it more than a few times now, and I keep going back to read it just one more time. Thanks!