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seen Jan 29 at 18:36

Feb
23
awarded  Yearling
Nov
4
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
22
awarded  Custodian
Mar
6
comment Why does the human visual system produce a bright patch after staring at a bright light source and looking away?
isn't it a dark patch, not a bright patch?
Mar
1
awarded  Benefactor
Feb
29
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
My position is that it implements pleasure and pain in a machine, but most people would of course say I am an idiot for making such a claim. :) If you'd like to see and discuss this offline so that I can get feedback prior to seeking a wider audience, email me: rjbrown at gmail.
Feb
29
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
Thank you everyone who participated in this. If anyone is interested, I have been developing a little program (it runs in javascript on a web page) that implements the mechanism I described. In other words it implements operant conditioning, and graphically demonstrates the "weighting of recently followed decision paths in response to a reward or punishment".
Feb
29
awarded  Scholar
Feb
29
accepted Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
@GaëlLaurans I don't want to debate philosophy with you. Not here anyway. I don't think that "consciousness" is anything other than an illusion, but this is not what this question is about. It is about a particular biological mechanism and what we understand of it. I used words you didn't think were appropriate, so I reframed the question for you, not using those words. I think others understood what I was getting at, so I'll leave it at that.
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
fyi, this is a pretty good answer, I'm going to dig through those articles. I'm come back and accept this answer soon, unless of course someone else posts one that gets even closer to what I'm trying to understand. :)
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
... The way I use "pleasure" as a shortcut is identical to how I might use the word 'perceive redness' as a shortcut for saying 'whatever happens in the eye and brain typically caused by light in the wavelength range of roughly 630–740nm striking the retina but occasionally being caused in other ways'. Note that I am not concerned about the qualia of redness, as I think that is a concept that is outside of hard science.
Feb
28
awarded  Commentator
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
@GaëlLaurans : "reward" is not particularly accurate because it can be interpreted as being external...for instance, the treat given to the dog is the reward, but whatever happens in the dogs brain that causes it to be "positively reinforced" due to receiving the treat is the _____. (I used the word "pleasure" for lack of a better term)
Feb
28
revised If someone becomes a split-brain patient, which side will “maintain” the continuity in their consciousness?
added 180 characters in body
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
And I don't really know what you mean by "dopamine neurons"...are these just things that are saying "this feels good!" or are they actually things that can contain logic for future behavior, which is the link that I am looking for? Unfortunately I can't get at the article without paying so all I have to go on is your paraphrase...
Feb
28
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
Where you say "they note that dopamine neurons suppress their activity in response to noxious stimuli"...this is getting at what I am looking for. Obviously it would be nice to see the other side, that 'dopamine neurons increase their activity in response to pleasurable stimuli', although I suppose this might be implied.
Feb
27
answered If someone becomes a split-brain patient, which side will “maintain” the continuity in their consciousness?
Feb
27
comment Do we understand the non-subjective mechanisms behind pleasure and pain?
Interesting. I have to say the way they describe this "pleasure gloss" seems so subjective, since it never seems tied back to anything concrete, like a tendency to repeat the behavior in the future.
Feb
27
awarded  Supporter