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Feb
26
comment How far can a signal travel in the neocortex without passing through the white matter?
(for borilla and @mcb) Thank you for your comments, which led me to re-research this area and correct some misconceptions I had. I will heavily edit the second paragraph as soon as I can.
Feb
12
comment Where is neuroplasticity limited in the brain?
The term "critical period" implies that regional plasticity ends thereafter. For instance, the critical period for ocular dominance to develop in primary visual cortex makes me wonder if plasticity in all or part of primary visual cortex ends after that critical period.
Jan
29
comment How are positions and counts of higher concepts encoded in sparse representations?
I'd expect the "face" neuron to fire if you were thinking of the appearance of a face, whether you could actually see it or not. But, I think you are wondering if the "face" neuron can fire when a face is detected only in periphery vision (and there were no other clues such as a voice or an attached body that would evoke "face"). I guess it would depend on degree of eccentricity of gaze, whether that part of the periphery has high enough resolution, and whether you have enough experience recognizing faces in that part of your periphery.
Jan
28
comment How are positions and counts of higher concepts encoded in sparse representations?
Your title seems to be missing some words: "How are positions and counts of higher _____ _____ encoded in sparse representations?" I've also read the description of your question, and, unfortunately, I cannot answer it. However, I'd suggest that representations are always distributed, so the position information may be at a lower level than the identity representation. Counting visual objects, on the other hand, requires an eye-motion algorithm (except in the case of the acquired skill of subitizing) based partly on the skill of pure, abstract counting. Where's the result stored?
Jan
28
comment Reciting Reverse Order Alphabet vs Reverse Order Counting
The sequences that are easy for you are easy because you've learned them already. Several points: A child who has just learned to count cannot count backwards because the child hasn't learned how yet. If you practice the alphabet backwards, you will learn it well. Unlike alphabets, number sequences can alternatively be learned by algorithm; so you can easily count down from 78,000 even if you've never done it before -- assuming you've learned the algorithm.
Dec
4
comment Perceptual flicker when rotating my face
See cogsci.stackexchange.com/questions/8716/…
Oct
13
comment Brain after (electrical) blackout
see cogsci.stackexchange.com/a/1954/421
Feb
25
comment Is there a better way to describe brain activity than EEG “brain waves”
@mac389 You said you will add to this sketch. I'd like to hear more of what you have to say.
Aug
10
comment Are there any studies that examine the phenomenon of songs stuck in the head?
see earworm
Jul
28
comment How should multiple Mechanical Turk research subjects from the same IP address be handled?
See stackoverflow.com/questions/2835915/…
Jul
16
comment Neural basis of primitive (newborn) reflexes
I believe I've found a single answer for all the primitive reflexes, so I revised the question to reflect that a single answer is expected. I'd like to reopen the question and answer it.
Feb
7
comment What causes dreamers to accept dreams as reality?
[I'm perhaps in the minority here.] I had thought the title meant "What causes people to accept recalled dreams as reality?" until the description of the question cleared that up for me. Nothing in the title presently indicates or implies that the acceptance occurs during the dream. Maybe rephrase the question "What causes dreaming people to accept their dream as reality?" or "What prevents dreaming people from wondering if they're dreaming?"
Jul
23
comment What is the term for human beings' tendency to obey without thinking?
Obedience is a form of the word "obey" in the title. It doesn't take into account the "without thinking" aspect. I don't know if any English word does.
Jul
18
comment Neural basis of primitive (newborn) reflexes
AFAIK, the involvement of the frontal areas is that they inhibit primitive reflexes.
Jul
14
comment What's the name of this visual search task?
Another question's answer is relevant.
Jun
21
comment When counting a given letter in sentences, why do people tend to omit occurrences in certain common words?
If my hypothesis is correct, then one of the edits changed the meaning of the original question for the worse: If the reader uses the "F" phoneme to scan the sentence for the letter "F", then "OF" will be missed because it has no "F" phoneme. I suggest removing "certain common words" from the edited question and don't add assumptions to questions.
Jun
14
comment Why do participants prefer to give input values that are “round numbers”?
@JeromyAnglim Are you sure this "Answer" answers your question? It's certainly helpful, but it doesn't explain participants' preferences. (Sorry if I'm missing something obvious.)
Jun
7
comment Theoretical limit to the use of mental faculty of the brain
That the brain is a muscle is only a metaphor: Use it or else it degrades.
May
30
comment What was his name again…ahh got it!
Another cogsci.SE answer goes into some detail on this phenomenon.
May
30
comment What was his name again…ahh got it!
This Question is similar to cogsci.stackexchange.com/q/1/421 .