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Jan
8
awarded  Yearling
Nov
16
awarded  Custodian
Nov
16
comment Difference vs. Ratio of evidence in sequential sampling models
I think what you say about the case of $Something/0$ requires that participants begin each trial with a prior value $0$ for each option, which isn't true - unbiased participants should start with a prior of $.5$ on each option, and adjust this belief in response to new evidence.
Nov
16
comment Difference vs. Ratio of evidence in sequential sampling models
Partial credit (+1): the reference is a good one (thanks), but as I understand it, it suggests the ratio to be best predictor in principle: "The decision requires the construction of a DV [decision variable] from e [the evidence]. For binary decisions, the DV is typically related to the ratio of the likelihoods of $h_1$ and $h_2$ given e: $l_{12}(e) ≡ P(e | h_1)/P(e | h_2)$".
Nov
12
asked Difference vs. Ratio of evidence in sequential sampling models
Oct
3
comment Is it possible to run Psychtoolbox or PsychoPy on Raspberry Pi 2 for simple perceptual experiments?
Aha! osdoc.cogsci.nl/getting-opensesame/raspberry-pi , and cogsci.nl/blog/miscellaneous/… . But as @matus has said, are you sure you really want to do this?
Oct
3
comment The prisoner dilemma does not violate classical probability laws
Finally, is this perhaps one of those strange quirks of frequentist interpretations of probability? Surely from a subjectivist point of view, this is straightforward.
Oct
3
comment The prisoner dilemma does not violate classical probability laws
As for your claim that we cannot compare the probability space from two different "experiments": either you've uncovered a hitherto unknown fundamental flaw in the logic of experimental psychology (where we compare probabilities from two different conditions all of the time), or you're mistaken. Why on earth can't we compare the two experiments?
Oct
3
comment The prisoner dilemma does not violate classical probability laws
I have to agree with @matus, below. The authors have not made a mistake: participants completing the Prisoner's Dilemma do not respect the law of total probability, or in other words, A is more likely to defect when they know what choice B made than when they don't, regardless of what that choice B actually makes.
Oct
3
comment Is it possible to run Psychtoolbox or PsychoPy on Raspberry Pi 2 for simple perceptual experiments?
Short answer: it's definitely possible (and I think it might have been discussed on www.cogsci.nl), but you almost certainly went be able to get highly accurate response times, or complex animation.
Sep
7
comment How can Bayesian inference improve upon logistic regression in incorporating psychometric data?
There's really nothing special about psychometric data in this regard, all of the usual advantages (and disadvantages) of Bayesian analyses, which have been well covered in your CrossValidated question, apply as well to psychometric data as to any other kind of analysis. What are you hoping to learn here?
Jul
9
awarded  Scholar
Jul
9
comment Does a recent general review of recurrent neural networks exist?
Fantastic, thanks! The system works!
Jul
9
accepted Does a recent general review of recurrent neural networks exist?
May
26
comment In what ways can neurons fire randomly?
Not an answer, but this paper from Wolpert's group in Cambridge speaks to some of these issues.
May
26
comment Does being read to improve reading speed?
Most people [citation needed] can read much faster than they can speak. Unless we're talking about incredibly slow reading, I would imaging that being read to would end up being quite a bit slower.
May
20
comment Gender differences in IQ among undergraduate psychology students
Just to reiterate, my interest in this isn't from a psychometric perspective - I really don't care if there does turn out to be some tiny gender difference in average IQ - but from an experimentalist perspective: I want to know if there are systematic variations in cognitive ability (and therefore reasoning ability) in the population on which I run all of my experiments.
May
20
comment Gender differences in IQ among undergraduate psychology students
My question wasn't about gender differences in $g$ in the population - I've a little bit of familiarity with that literature, enough to know that I don't want to know any more about it - but about possible selection biases which lead to gender differences within this extremely well studied population. The thesis you refer to at the end touches on the topic, but I haven't seen anyone run the analysis that would explicitly answer my question: collate IQ measures from thousands of undergraduates, and compare any gender effects there to any found in the population norming sample for those tests.
May
20
comment Gender differences in IQ among undergraduate psychology students
Agreed. There's a lot of interesting information here, and I've upvoted, but it doesn't answer my question about about psychology students - specifically, do the men who chose to study psychology tend to have higher IQs than the women who chose to do so, due to some kind of selection effect.
May
12
revised Does a recent general review of recurrent neural networks exist?
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