844 reputation
10
bio website eointravers.github.io
location Belfast, United Kingdom
age 24
visits member for 11 months
seen 2 days ago

Dec
17
comment Are Satoshi Kanazawa's findings about racial differences in attractiveness valid?
This work is also discusses on this site here
Dec
17
comment How is intelligence correlated to beauty?
See also Jeromy Anglim's discussion of the same paper on this site a while ago.
Dec
17
comment How is intelligence correlated to beauty?
(Continuation...) This isn't the place to discuss his career, but I think users should be wary of blindly accepting his findings at face value. Added bonus critique here
Dec
17
comment How is intelligence correlated to beauty?
I'm sure I've raised this on this site before, but Satoshi Kanazawa's work is hugely controversial, including accusations of racism, statistical mispractice, and even not understanding what a correlation is.
Dec
7
comment Memory - Remembering a Source
You're describing the distinction between semantic, and episodic memory, which is quite easy to look up. In short, the former is facts and knowledge, the latter is specific events from your own experience, and they're based on possibly different processes.
Nov
13
answered Are cognitive biases hardwired in the brain or they are acquired during lifetime?
Nov
11
awarded  Student
Nov
11
asked Gender differences in IQ among undergraduate psychology students
Oct
28
comment Is there a term for people who hate (or don't prefer ) things that are mainstream?
As I said, it's a colloquial term in English. See here, for example.
Oct
28
comment Is there a term for people who hate (or don't prefer ) things that are mainstream?
Outside of psychology, the colloquial term would have to be "Histers", wouldn't it?
Oct
28
comment Do Jewish people have better cognitive abilities than average population?
I think it's necessary, if we're going to cite Richard Lynn's work, to acknowledge that he has been widely criticised as, variously, racist, xenophobic, homophobic, and guilty of gross statistical malpractice. While this isn't the place to discuss Lynn's legacy, we aught to at least mention that his findings aren't exactly without controversy. All that aside, nice answer.
Oct
27
comment Different neural structures for quick vs. methodical decision making
+1. I went and grossly simplified the argument into black and white terms. I think it's because I've been interacting with undergraduates again.
Oct
27
comment Different neural structures for quick vs. methodical decision making
Whoops, thought I had replied here. I don't disagree with you: "emotion" certainly involves regions traditionally considered the substrate of "cognition", and vice versa - the idea of completely isolated, distinct neural modules for every kind of progress is considered pretty far off the mark nowadays by most researchers. Nevertheless, these regions are still differentiated, and system two processes (or Working Memory, if you prefer) primarily rely on prefrontal cortical networks, while system one processes don't.
Oct
24
answered Different neural structures for quick vs. methodical decision making
Sep
10
comment Where in the brain is meaning extracted from visual information?
A caveat: Knowing where in the brain something happens tells us almost nothing about how it happens (although it does make for a pretty picture in magazines). If you are interested in how words are processed, the go-to reference is usually Colheart et al's (2001) Dual Route Cascaded (DRC) model - although this is a bit of a monster of a paper, so you can find easy summaries of it on Google.
Sep
10
comment What are the different types of cognition?
Welcome to cogsci.se! The scope of this question is huge. I think the only place to start is an introductory textbook, like this one. I would also distinguish between "types" and "theories" of cognition: maybe edit either your question title, or the question itself, depending on what you really want to know.
Sep
5
comment Phenomena where group truly feels a certain way, but each member says that they feel the other way to avoid being the odd one out
Polarization isn't exactly what you describe in the question. When a group becomes polarized, the beliefs they had to begin with become more extreme from exposure to like-minded individuals - i.e. if you leave a group of moderately racist people in a room together, they will come out more bigoted than when they came in due to polarization.
Sep
4
comment What's the term for people who deny others' achievements?
Begrudgers. But that's a colloquial, rather than psychological, term.
Sep
4
answered What sort of things are considered as “data” in cognitive science?
Aug
26
answered What causes words repeated in your head to start fading away from consciousness?