1,695 reputation
412
bio website
location Oxford, UK
age
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 42 mins ago

Aug
22
comment Are there useful applications for three channel consumer EEG?
What an amazing answer!
Aug
18
comment What is the relation between general and linear prediction in espicifice and Evoked Potentials signal behaviour?
What does 'espicifice' mean?
Aug
5
comment Why do dreams lose clarity quickly over time after we awaken?
In case I don't manage to find the time to dig up the reference (I have it somewhere on an external disk, no idea who the authors are): a neurotransmitter that is crucial for transforming short-term into long-term memories is inactive in the hippocampus during sleep. Interestingly, HM, a patient who couldn't achieve long-term memories due to an operation when both hippocampi were removed, described his state as constantly waking from a dream.
Jul
31
comment Diffrence between SSVEP and P300
Interesting stuff! I have indeed also come across some papers where the steady-state response is modulated by top-down factors, so it appears not to be purely stimulus-driven. And a lot of new research shows attention and expectation modulation of sensory components that are quite early. I just have the impression that the consensus is that these modulations are surprising for the SSVEP/AEP, while they are a given for the P3. In fact I don't even know if there is any discernible P3 component in the absence of top-down effects?
Jul
26
comment How does the frequency of a visual stimulus affect the steady-state visually evoked potential?
The refresh rate is the rate at which the image on your screen gets renewed. I think that for most monitors it's 60 Hz. But it's often more complicated than that, because screens often don't refresh the entire image at once (e.g. they might do it line by line, or odd vs. even lines, or center to surround). But some of this flicker would probably be visible in the neural response. I'm not too sure about that though, maybe it's too subtle to be registered as neural activity.
Jul
26
comment How does the frequency of a visual stimulus affect the steady-state visually evoked potential?
By amplitude modulation I mean this. In this picture the carrier signal is the frequency of the tone, whereas the modulating sine wave signal is what I call amplitude modulation. The result is an amplitude modulated signal: it's a tone of a given pitch, that gets louder and softer at the frequency of the modulating sine wave signal. This frequency should also be visible in the neural response.
Jul
23
comment How do laypeople form a judgement that another person is smart or intelligent?
I don't have a reference because I heard it in class long ago, but the professor of the course on intelligence told us that people are fairly accurate (whatever that means) in assessing other people's intelligence - if it's lower or similar to theirs. But they can't make fine grained judgments about people who are more intelligent.
Jun
13
comment How to get more involved with personality psychology as a hobby?
Also, social psychology has a lot to say on why people behave the way they do. The difference is that it talks about general tendencies in behaviour, while personality psychology goes into the differences between individuals, as well as how they self-reflect.
Jun
13
comment How to get more involved with personality psychology as a hobby?
Just a small tip for searching for literature: personality psych also goes under the name of psychology of individual differences, as well as (less often) differential psychology.
Jun
2
comment Difficulty of having profound scientific discussions with more than 2 or 3 people?
I love this question. I've been thinking about the same thing lately (how to get the best discussions out of a large, diverse group of students) and my intuition is also that a small group of people on a similar level works best.
May
8
comment How fast is the visual system?
Although, now that I think about it, the MLR wouldn't be coming from A1, even though it would be measured on the scalp.
May
8
comment How fast is the visual system?
"the potential over V1 is more like 100 ms after stimulus." Wait, what? I get a peak of activity over V1 after about 100 ms in my MEG study. I've also seen reports of A1 effects at 15 ms or less after tone onset (early MLR response).
Apr
26
comment Can dreams be memorised?
I think this can be easily answered. I will find my course notes one of these days to give the details, but it is known that some neurotransmitter necessary for translating short-term into long-term menory is inactive during sleep.
Apr
14
comment How does the brain read rotated text?
This is a very nice answer. I'd like to add that we probably first need to learn that the orientation of a letter matters in the first place (i.e. it can be a different letter if seen from a different orientation, like p and d). With all other objects, their identity remains the same no matter from what angle we see them from.
Mar
27
comment Which are the most accredited tests for measuring personality traits?
I think this is an OK question! I even had a similar exam question as a student for my personality psychology course: "Why big 5 instead of big 3 or small 16?" (i.e. Costa&McCrae vs. Eysenck vs. Spearman).
Feb
18
comment Why do long range axons in mammals travel in white matter tracts?
Very interesting indeed! Let me speculate: a lot of neighbouring neurons from one area will need to connect to neighbouring neurons in the next area in a processing stream. If they all follow the shortest path, they will end up in a bundle.
Feb
14
comment Are “dumb product warning labels” an indicator of change of intelligence of general public?
To claim that IQ might be dropping because of something, you first have to ascertain that it is in fact dropping. But, as you already say, according to research, it's rising. So, no, it's not dropping because of the labels, because it's not dropping.
Feb
13
comment Innate personality tests: do they exist? If not, why?
That's definitely true. But if you want to examine personality, you have to start from looking at how people behave, or feel, or think, and these are already influenced by a combination of genes and environment. Scientists are looking for genes as well, but it seems that personality traits are the outcome of many mutually interacting genes, rather than just a few, like eyes. So in the end it's hard to say anything about any of the individual genes present in this massive interaction.
Feb
12
comment Innate personality tests: do they exist? If not, why?
You seem to think that innate and environmental effects have independent influences on personality, i.e. that they don't interact. How come?
Feb
5
comment What are “linear spatial weightings” and “specific temporal windows” in Philiastides & Sajda (2006)?
@NickStauner - I wish I knew the answer though! I've never done pattern classification myself (it's on my to-do list for this semester!). I do know that the psychometric function refers to the data itself, and not to something the algorithm does.