2,832 reputation
624
bio website
location Tel Aviv, Israel
age 31
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Apr 15 at 20:10

Studying neuroscience at the Hebrew University.

My main interest is how the cognitive system combines prior knowledge about the world in the process of perception.


May
5
answered Do people estimate combined probabilities differently to uncombined ones?
May
4
comment Do people estimate combined probabilities differently to uncombined ones?
Welcome to CogSci. This sounds like an interesting question, but after the example in the last paragraph, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by cumulative and non cumulative. The term cumulative as I know it refers to questions like "what is the probability of at least 4 heads in tosses", while non cumulative would be "what is the probability of exactly 4 heads in 6 tosses". Is that what you mean? If not, can you be more specific and define what you mean by the term?
May
4
answered Neurotransmitters appearance in the evolutionary process
Apr
29
comment Math or Physics: Which is the more relevant background to enter Cognitive Sciences and Psychology?
+1. In physics, most experiments are so reliably reproducible, that you rarely encounter the need for solid knowledge of statistics. At least for me, this was a weak point for some time after moving to cognitive science...
Apr
28
answered Math or Physics: Which is the more relevant background to enter Cognitive Sciences and Psychology?
Apr
16
comment Is there a variance in acceptance of conspiracy theories by occupation?
The article you link to is actually a book review about this book: amazon.com/… . From the review it sounds like an interesting book, but doesn't answer your question.
Mar
16
revised What was the experiment where a person is given something and then has to share it with another person
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Mar
16
answered What was the experiment where a person is given something and then has to share it with another person
Feb
3
revised Psychology of timbre processing
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Jan
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
comment Why is training better when following an easy-to-difficult schedule?
The thing that makes most gradient descent algorithms learn faster at the beginning is simply the larger learning rate parameter, forced onto the algorithm, and not the difficulty of examples.
Dec
16
awarded  Scholar
Dec
16
accepted How does task difficulty schedule affect the rate and efficiency of perceptual learning?
Dec
13
answered What neural mechanism explains the tendency to visually attend to the whole scene before attending to details?
Oct
30
comment Analysis of parameter estimates from Ratcliff diffusion model
Is there anything specific to Ratcliff's model here? Because the way I see it, this question is equally valid to any model you fit to any multi-subject data.
Oct
30
comment Analysis of parameter estimates from Ratcliff diffusion model
"My understanding was that it is not a valid approach to put together estimates from models with different parameters" - Where did you understand that from?
Oct
26
answered How can the success of Bayesian models be reconciled with demonstrations of heuristic and biased reasoning?
Sep
21
comment What is the threshold where actions are perceived as “instant”?
There is a difference between the question "what is the smallest time interval between 2 stimuli we can discriminate" and "what is the smallest time interval between action and response that we can discriminate". If we perform an action that is expected to have an immediate response, we are much more likely to perceive the response as immediate. We don't have such predisposition for 2 stimuli. So I would assume we perceive as instantaneous much larger time delay for action-response than the time interval needed to tell 2 arbitrary stimuli apart.
Sep
21
answered What is the threshold where actions are perceived as “instant”?
Aug
28
awarded  Nice Answer