1,307 reputation
313
bio website facebook.com/csclyde
location Davis, CA
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jan 4 at 8:21

I'm a Neuroscience student at UC Davis. Brains are my thang.


Sep
3
comment Is religiousness a genetically heritable feature?
@MartaCz-C My point is: we might not be prone to the idea, the idea may be prone to us. It's just another vantage point that I don't think adds up to a full answer. I'm not telling you what you think, merely providing another view.
Sep
3
comment Is religiousness a genetically heritable feature?
Consider the opposite. If evolution adapts a creature to it's physical environment, might the idea of Christianity itself be evolving to fit the environment of the human mind? If so, finding a gene for religiousness would be nonsense because you'd only find genes for normal mental development.
Aug
22
comment Why do humans have sex in private?
To those who grow up in a nudist colony, nudity does not elicit disgust or shame. Even in ugly people.
Aug
22
comment Why do humans have sex in private?
Yet, private sex seems to transcend individual cultures. Not in an absolute way, but there is a definite trend. I like that you go to Exhibitionism as part of your explanation, I think that could be fruitful. But your answer right now is mostly just a guess.
Aug
18
comment What makes people easily subscribe to pseudoscientific theories?
This is a superb answer. Well done.
Aug
6
comment How can STDP fit with reciprocal connectivity?
@Xurtio I see. I was equivocating a bit because I couldn't produce a direct source. It's just inference from other things I know of the nervous system. I'll try and find sources and edit the answer to be more certain.
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@bfrs Start thinking in terms of activity. That is what counts. The neurons can be considered conduits for this activity. Activity generated by some external happening travels into the nervous system, and that activity inherently represents what caused it. That is the foundation of the functioning of the nervous system, and it can be a little difficult to digest. Here is one more example to clarify: how does the nervous system differentiate between a touch on the toe and on the finger? Because the sensory neurons in the toe inherently represent activity there. No need to code the location.
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@bfrs Because each ganglion cell has it's own axonal projection to the LGN. The LGN is more or less a topographical map of ganglion cells, so the information is preserved.
Jul
26
comment Does each sensory neuron type have a characteristic spike sequence pattern?
@bfrs Auditory physiology has advanced significantly since Bekesy. The paper I linked shows this, and you can find many more on the same subject. I do not believe I have misunderstood you. You're not considering that the individuality of neurons is itself a type of encoding. The upper regions know which is which because different retinal ganglion cells (simplification here) respond to different colors. When a green/red ganglion cell fires, it is informing the upper regions that there is green/red within that place on the retina. No extra information needs to be encoded in the firing rate.
Jul
22
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@bfrs Vegetative states usually occur with massive damage that disrupts the brain to the point where it can't function. What I mean is, damage that disrupts only the self aspect of brain function. For instance, damage to A1 might disrupt only perception of sound. Disruption of IT might only disrupt perception of objects. Other functions remain in-tact. A vegetative state is essentially a loss of all functions. Unless you claim that all functions rely on the self function. But a look at phylogeny shows that to be extremely unlikely.
Jul
21
comment Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
@bfrs Look through reports on TBI, and show me one instance of a person losing nothing but their "self". If the self comes together at some physical point, would it not make sense to find cases where a person loses no function except their "self"? Instead what you see are specific deficits in one aspect of perception, action, integration, or memory. The "self", or consciousness, or whatever, is a dynamic illusion resulting from the fact that we view people as single entities. Cell biology says otherwise, you can lose and gain cells and still be "you". No one part of your body defines "you".
Jun
25
comment How can the success of Bayesian models be reconciled with demonstrations of heuristic and biased reasoning?
Good response. I'd like to add that the brain feeds it's own activity back onto itself. So if you use a Bayesian model of learning, it's not simply collecting external information; the prior state of the system is being constantly factored into the new state along with external information.
Mar
31
comment Where do our memories get stored and how are they retrieved again?
I think what he is talking about is the actual physical structure of the neurons encoding information. I have an answer involving axon growth, dendritic spine growth, etc... I voted to re-open the question, but some edits (including a link to the paper, fleshing the question out) would be appreciated.
Mar
17
comment What is the difference between IQ and Executive Function?
I think the concepts you're trying to understand here are too large, and incomparable. I'm voting to close this, but I think asking questions to learn more about the "pieces" (IQ, executive function, Dopamine receptors, emotional control) could be a good idea. Each one itself is a vast, vast topic. I don't think this is the wrong stack exchange, but I do think the question needs to be whittled down if it is to produce an insightful answer!
Mar
3
comment Behaviorist interpretations of decision field theory
I'm curious why you want a behaviorist explanation. It seems like a slight step backwards?
Feb
29
comment Are there sex differences in inter-rater consistency of attractiveness ratings of opposite-sex faces?
This may not answer your exact question, but I think it is relevant: blog.okcupid.com/index.php/your-looks-and-online-dating blog.okcupid.com/index.php/the-mathematics-of-beauty
Feb
29
comment Why aren't sleep measures consistently measured as mediators/moderators of cognitive performance?
Isn't every variable "random noise" until it is controlled for?
Feb
22
comment When is higher confidence predictive of less accuracy?
Perhaps in questions where there is no correct answer. All answers are insufficient, so the more confident you are the more wrong you are.
Feb
18
comment Are there axioms in the mind?
I'm adding this as a comment because I'm not sure if it is what you're asking, but I'd say that an axoim of the mind is: Events that consistently happen in temporal sequence are assumed to have a causal relationship
Feb
17
comment Do porn and other remotely perceived entertainments work because of Mirror Neurons?
It's possible that the sexual pleasure itself is being mirrored.