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(a.k.a. jonsca here)

Sir Charles Scott Sherrington is one of my science heroes, so I'm featuring him on my cogsci profile. He is often credited with coining the word "synapse."


Sep
12
comment Why do people avoid taking the last “donut”?
Sounds like a job for our in-house expert on Evolutionary Game Theory.
Sep
10
comment Analysis according to Jung's Psychological Types
We try to discourage "self-help" questions on the site and this was right on the borderline as originally asked. I removed those aspects so it can be answered more generally. I'm not affiliated with them, and I don't necessarily think this is the best approach to find someone, but Psychology Today has lists of therapists that self-identify their treatment philosophies therapists.psychologytoday.com, and there is a "Jungian" category. I'm not entirely sure what that entails these days, but you could certainly message or call a few of them.
Sep
4
comment Does nearing sleep onset distort our conscious imagination?
I put that part in at the end. Putting in the part about your specific conditions makes this more difficult to generalize, I think.
Sep
4
comment Does nearing sleep onset distort our conscious imagination?
See if I captured what you are after with this current edit. I took the part out about your medical history. You can fill in any more of the gaps as necessary.
Sep
4
comment Does nearing sleep onset distort our conscious imagination?
Can you reformulate this so it's less about your experience and more about the concepts behind this? As you probably know, we discourage self-help questions. This is right on the borderline, but I think there may be some interesting research into this area out there, so it's definitely worth keeping around.
Sep
3
comment Would it be possible for a person to have social anxiety and yet be an extrovert who shows signs of extreme empathy?
We tend to steer clear of self-help issues here, so I have removed the personal aspect of the question. I think you will still get an applicable answer this way.
Sep
3
comment What tools are available for EEG analysis on the R platform?
I think this is fine here topic-wise. It's definitely also specific enough that it won't just get a laundry list answer.
Aug
28
comment Can microdialysis be made in Drosophila melanogaster?
@NickStauner I can certainly appreciate your arguments. I think in this instance there's not that degree of ambiguity between the method's use in different disciplines, but I do concede to your point (and jona's) that it might get a different set of eyes on Bio.SE.
Aug
28
comment Was the anthropological “Negroid, Mongoloid, Caucasoid” distinction inspired by the Bible story of Noah's sons?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a social sciences issue rather than one pertaining to the cognitive sciences.
Aug
27
comment Can microdialysis be made in Drosophila melanogaster?
(this page reads like an advertisement, but it is a good summary - psychogenics.com/microdialysis.html)
Aug
27
comment Can microdialysis be made in Drosophila melanogaster?
@NickStauner I disagree, this is a common method in neuroscience.
Aug
25
comment What is a good rough rule of thumb regarding required sample size for questionnaire studies?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effect_size#Cohen.27s_d
Aug
24
comment What is a good rough rule of thumb regarding required sample size for questionnaire studies?
At its heart this is a good question. It's tough to answer without knowing what your metric for "meaningful" is. A starting point would be Cohen's d, but I don't know how accepted that is in the survey community.
Aug
19
comment Why can't we use 100% of the brain in a certain moment?
In a grossly oversimplified sense, disorders like schizophrenia and mania are a result of "overactivity" of certain transmitter systems, so "more is better" is just as faulty an argument within neuroscience as it is in political science.
Aug
19
comment Why can't we use 100% of the brain in a certain moment?
the point is that we do not use more than a 10% in any moment That's not really true, either. theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/07/…
Aug
7
comment Can one become less neurotic?
It depends on how you measure "neurotic", really.
Aug
6
comment Can a person control their brain's electrical activity?
The P300 response will not be as pronounced, but won't be completely eliminated in the case of "if the user knows that stimulus..." that you cite in the comment. Remember that we analyze these EEG patterns over multiple epochs (short periods of time) and can time-lock them to the stimulus, so we can "line up" the responses and average them.
Aug
6
comment Can a person control their brain's electrical activity?
@Learner It's laid out in the Wikipedia article, but if you have an auditory stimulus that's going "beep, beep, beep, beep", and every few seconds there is a "boop" mixed in, the "boop" is a low-probability stimulus (less likely to occur) and will generate a more pronounced P300 wave. This phenomenon can occur naturally as well if we are surprised by something (a siren on a quiet day, etc.). I don't quite know how such an effect manifests for a visual stimulus, but I imagine that the "oddball" effect is somewhat similar.
Aug
6
comment Can a person control their brain's electrical activity?
@Learner Haven't forgotten about your question, sorry
Jul
31
comment How do ligands bind to and release from receptors?
This is the text used in the course. It's gone up a lot in price, but it's very helpful.