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(a.k.a. jonsca here)

Sir Charles Scott Sherrington is one of my science heroes, so I'm featuring him on my cogsci profile. He is often credited with coining the word "synapse."


Nov
2
reviewed Reviewed Is the Neanderthal Theory of Autistic brain a reasonable scientific theory?
Nov
2
reviewed Reviewed How is it that taking a break from a problem sometimes allows you to figure out the answer?
Nov
2
reviewed Close Can thought be shifted between subconscious and conscious awareness?
Nov
2
comment What kinds of maths to learn for understanding dynamical systems in cognitive science?
more intuitive grasp of things, but might be more painful in the short-term.
Nov
2
comment What kinds of maths to learn for understanding dynamical systems in cognitive science?
Let me preface this by saying I think this question might be a bit too open ended for the site, but to give you a head start... Well, don't be embarrassed you haven't taken calculus, everyone has to start somewhere. However, I would say that a solid course in differential equations is a prereq for anything "dynamical", and that normally requires a couple of semesters of single variable, and usually a semester of multivariable calculus to stomach it all. Of course, you could just start studying the dynamical systems and fill in whatever math you run across, which will give you a
Nov
1
comment Abstract idealized mental visualization improves motor task performance
I don't think this has anything to do with what he's asking about, actually. Those are single-unit studies in the brainstem in a descending pathway, what the OP is referring to is more of a cortical representation problem.
Nov
1
comment Abstract idealized mental visualization improves motor task performance
I think this is an interesting question as is, but if you want to get a head start with it, searching on terms like "internal representation" and "intrinsic coordinates" should get you some hits for a general overview.
Nov
1
answered Why is Asperger Syndrome poorly recognised in France?
Nov
1
comment How can I test whether Dorsal Raphe Nucleus(DRN) activity at night is related to variations in mood?
The thing about commercially available headbands is that they don't use any sort of gel to interface with the scalp, so you really end up with EMGs of the forehead muscles.
Nov
1
revised Why is Asperger Syndrome poorly recognised in France?
edited tags
Oct
31
comment How can I test whether Dorsal Raphe Nucleus(DRN) activity at night is related to variations in mood?
I haven't read this article, but it talks about (with respect to a clinical symptom, but that's not at issue here) alternative methods of detecting REM onset. You wouldn't have to go all out, but even just recording chin EMG would give you more info than no physiological signals. If you placed electrodes in a consistent spot that you measure in from some facial feature, it might give you the kind of reproducibility that you want.
Oct
31
comment Why is Asperger Syndrome poorly recognised in France?
A note about the "abnormal-psychology" tag, this is not a value judgement by any means, but this condition tends to get coverage in journals which are earmarked as "abnormal psychology", perhaps erroneously at this point.
Oct
31
revised Why is Asperger Syndrome poorly recognised in France?
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Oct
31
revised Is Decision Making/Theory/Analysis applicable to game design?
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Oct
31
comment How can I test whether Dorsal Raphe Nucleus(DRN) activity at night is related to variations in mood?
I think your project is a neat idea, don't get me wrong, but getting information from the nervous system without interacting with it in a more direct fashion somehow (EEGs, EMGs - even surface ones measuring legs or chin muscles, or some sort of implantable array) is largely guessing, IMO.
Oct
31
comment How can I test whether Dorsal Raphe Nucleus(DRN) activity at night is related to variations in mood?
The raphe is only half of the story, unfortunately, as a large proportion of its regulation of mood is through indirect effects on frontal dopaminergic neurons. Also, the advantage of the study above is that it was done invasively, with electrodes in the brain of the animal, along with invasive EMG electrodes, which pick up a lot more activity from twitches and small movements that an actigraph would never in a million years recognize. The disadvantage of your system is that it is even further removed from the situation than these recordings are.
Oct
31
comment What is a good beginner level book on neuroanatomy?
and it reinforces the prior lessons as you go, there's a lot of writing and copying (I don't know how well that would work in the Kindle edition, so getting the spiral bound might be better), so check the preview before you buy it to see if it will fit your learning style.
Oct
31
comment What is a good beginner level book on neuroanatomy?
I think this may be too broad, and a "shopping" question, so it will likely be closed. It largely depends on what you meant by "what I learnt back at school". Was it an undergraduate course? A applied/practical course for medical workers/therapists, etc? Check out this book I used it as a refresher before taking a grad level course. It's very mechanical [con't]
Oct
31
revised What is a good beginner level book on neuroanatomy?
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Oct
28
revised How is light processed by the human brain when awake and in dreams?
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