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(a.k.a. jonsca here)

Sir Charles Scott Sherrington is one of my science heroes, so I'm featuring him on my cogsci profile. He is often credited with coining the word "synapse."


1d
comment Can Fetal Alcohol Syndrome children suceed in the Social Sciences? Or should they stick to trade school
@Cbaker510 Read the passage that I highlighted. I can find you plenty of contractors and tradespeople that face very complex logistical problems on a daily basis. Your assertion of "limited intellectual ability" in those professions is nonsense. That is trolling.
2d
comment Why can't we use 100% of the brain in a certain moment?
In a grossly oversimplified sense, disorders like schizophrenia and mania are a result of "overactivity" of certain transmitter systems, so "more is better" is just as faulty an argument within neuroscience as it is in political science.
2d
comment Why can't we use 100% of the brain in a certain moment?
the point is that we do not use more than a 10% in any moment That's not really true, either. theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/07/…
Aug
18
comment Can Fetal Alcohol Syndrome children suceed in the Social Sciences? Or should they stick to trade school
Given that most of these vocations involve limited intellectual ability You're just trolling here. This is untrue and insulting.
Aug
7
comment Can one become less neurotic?
It depends on how you measure "neurotic", really.
Aug
6
comment Can a person control their brain's electrical activity?
The P300 response will not be as pronounced, but won't be completely eliminated in the case of "if the user knows that stimulus..." that you cite in the comment. Remember that we analyze these EEG patterns over multiple epochs (short periods of time) and can time-lock them to the stimulus, so we can "line up" the responses and average them.
Aug
6
comment Can a person control their brain's electrical activity?
@Learner It's laid out in the Wikipedia article, but if you have an auditory stimulus that's going "beep, beep, beep, beep", and every few seconds there is a "boop" mixed in, the "boop" is a low-probability stimulus (less likely to occur) and will generate a more pronounced P300 wave. This phenomenon can occur naturally as well if we are surprised by something (a siren on a quiet day, etc.). I don't quite know how such an effect manifests for a visual stimulus, but I imagine that the "oddball" effect is somewhat similar.
Aug
6
comment Can a person control their brain's electrical activity?
@Learner Haven't forgotten about your question, sorry
Aug
2
reviewed Leave Open What causes people to rapidly lose skill after becoming moderately good at something?
Aug
2
reviewed Satisfactory What to call measures obtained between pre-test and post-test?
Aug
2
reviewed Satisfactory Name for the need to reply “you can’t fire me, I quit”
Aug
2
reviewed Excellent Do we have a predisposition to view visual stimuli in a clockwise pattern?
Aug
2
reviewed Excellent Why can't people solve a riddle if you tell them irrelevant information?
Aug
2
reviewed Needs Improvement Is there a name for a person who looks for a name for another person's supposed faults?
Aug
2
reviewed Needs Improvement Are there any proven ways to increase concentration and focus?
Aug
2
reviewed Excellent Is EEG brain-computer interface reliable?
Aug
2
reviewed Excellent Is there any standardized test / questionnaire to measure frustration?
Aug
2
reviewed Satisfactory Is learning and memory formation mostly comprised of new synapses forming, or already-existent synapses strengthening?
Aug
2
reviewed Excellent How many trials are needed to estimate a response time distribution?
Aug
2
revised Why *fractional* anisotropy?
edited tags