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May
1
comment Theoretical grounding for Agile/Scrum methodologies in software development
The people who voted to close (one of them has withdrawn their vote since the edits), voted it as "unclear what you are asking". Hopefully this has clarified it for them.
Apr
17
comment Is the Orch-OR Penrose-Hameroff model for consciousness sensible?
@remDup okay. I will close this question as a duplicate of the first one. After you read those friends, if you have further questions then feel free to ask a new question or edit this one with further clarifications (if you edit then flag the question after editing so I know you want it reopened).
Apr
16
comment Is the Orch-OR Penrose-Hameroff model for consciousness sensible?
As @KeeganKeplinger mentions, can you explain why this discussion doesn't answer you? If you want to read further then maybe this reddit discussion and my blog post might guide you as to why people usually don't usually seriously consider Penrose & Hameroff.
Apr
14
comment How to compare tasks completed by neural architectures objectively?
This is a nice question. One approach is to go as you are proposing from the direction of task difficulty, a dual idea would be to look at the complexity of the neural networks that solve the tasks. For that you might find this CogSci question and this cstheory question useful.
Apr
9
comment References for biologically plausible models of knowledge representation?
@Seanny123 I wasn't suggesting characterizing it as such. I was just giving examples of questions that are "how biologically plausible is x?" or "what are the downsides of x?" and x just happened to be bayesian models because those are posts I happened to remember.
Apr
9
comment References for biologically plausible models of knowledge representation?
@Seanny123 your comment could be turned into a separate question on the biological feasibility of VSA. Kind of like similar but more broad questions for biological plausibility and other downsides and limitations of bayesian models.
Mar
6
comment Overview of Pitts & McCullough (1943) “A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous activity”
I will look into having your previous accounts merged into this one. Thank you for registering.
Mar
5
comment Overview of Pitts & McCullough (1943) “A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous activity”
You have at least three seperate accounts: 1, 2, 3. All of them are unregistered, if you register an account then we can merge all of them together which will allow you to more fully participate in this StackExchange.
Mar
5
comment Overview of Pitts & McCullough (1943) “A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous activity”
Their paper is cited by many as the first introduction of deterministic finite state automata into computer science (although in my opinion some work in idustrial engineering preceeds this). Thus it is very important for the history of CS; I don't think it is nearly as important for neuroscience, unfortunately :(.
Mar
4
comment Does explaining a visual guidance system affect visual attention distribution?
When this leaves testing, and is used with (I assume) student drivers, will it be explained to them? Or are you just trying to use this in a study to learn how people scan normally and giving the cues as an "aha! I gotcha! There was danger here!"?
Mar
3
comment How does human brain pick out the most likely representation of object when an object is ambiguous?
How is feature recognition any different from voting of different networks? What do you think recognizes the features? Or do you literally believe that there is a "potato" and a "grenade" neural network in your brain that is somehow distinct from the "networks for other objects"? Finally, is it possible to remove the images? They don't add anything to the question except length.
Mar
3
comment What is relationship between being a good person and functioning in society?
Welcome to CogSci @DavidBasanta, that seems like an interesting question that is too long for comments. You should consider making it a separate self-contained question on the site.
Mar
3
comment Are words and ideas written in a distinctive font easier to remember?
If something is less legible then it takes more effort to read and since you devote more effort, you are more likely to engage in more active reading which tends to promote retention. I would explore this route.
Feb
14
comment When was it recognized that thinking occurs in the brain and not in the heart?
I think this is historic cherry-picking; if you dig enough among the Greeks you will find almost any belief (most prominent example of this is saying that the Greeks predicted atomic theory because of Democritus). The question becomes (as you point out in the comments), did any large body subscribe to this belief beyond a few disciples? I would argue that they didn't, because in the 3rd century BC, Aristotle was still promoting the brain as refrigerator and had much more historic significance than Alcmaeon.
Feb
14
comment What does a cortical column do?
Here's an example of a much better focused question on bio.SE.
Feb
14
comment What does a cortical column do?
@H.Muster I was actually going to make the same comment, but I was surprised by how uninformative that wikipedia article and the discussion here were. In general, a quick Google search doesn't reveal an obvious definitive resource, either. Hence, it might be good to provide a canonical answer here if jonsca has time. Of course, I do wish that the OP would focus the question more, since it is pretty vague.
Feb
12
comment Cosyne vs CNS conferences for Computational Neuroscience?
@ChuckSherrington I don't think your characterization of NIPS is accurate, it doesn't 'mix in some ML and AI' it is one of the two premier ML conferences, which might mix in a little bit of comp neuro. In reality, I think the typical comp neuro lab would have a very difficult time trying to publish there. For instance, take a look at the 2013 proceedings.
Feb
6
comment Is there a scientific term for when you fall asleep because you can't handle something?
@SamWhited you should consider taking a look at this article and the answers on this question and then use them to frame a new more specific question about the relationship between sleep and depression. I think that would be interesting.
Feb
6
comment Is there a scientific term for when you fall asleep because you can't handle something?
I am not 100% sure how what you describe is different from a combination of fainting on one hand (if it is an instantaneous encounter) and a common side-effect of depression (to "avoid facing the day") on the other hand (if it is one of break-up, lose job, etc cases). Both are looked at by abnormal-psych. (Edit: After typing this comment, I see that @Monacraft's answer describes exactly this)
Feb
6
comment Is there a scientific term for when you fall asleep because you can't handle something?
@NickStauner I guess I use abnormal-psychology more widely than most, I would consider it for things like psychological responses to extreme conditions not typically experiences by people. An (potentially incorrect) example I would give is: many people who experience trench warfare come-back with shell-shock, so that could be seen as a normal response, however studying shell-shock would still be under abnormal-psych. Of course, I am by no means an authority on this, and if you guys think my edit is wrong you can reverse it or add some other tags.