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Jul
29
comment Is quantum tunneling required for nerve signals to cross the dendritic synaptic barrier?
If you want a detailed explanations of what many quantum neurological models are missing, see this answer. If you want to see an example when an operationalist approach to quantum modeling in psychology is not hokum, see this answer for overview and this answer for a list of empirical examples that quantum models of decision making perform better on. Finally, you might also find this blogpost useful.
Jul
11
comment Why only 16 Jungian types? Combinatorially it should be 2 * 4! = 48
@blz asking questions about Jung and psychoanalysis is on topic as long as the question is one that might be of interest to a cognitive science audience (often understanding the history or why certain things have gone out of fashion is of interest). The real problem with this question is that it is poorly asked, and doesn't seem to have much initial research. I would advise the user to consult this thread.
Jun
2
comment Where do our memories get stored and how are they retrieved again?
@honi for these kind of very marginal questions, it is sometimes very instructive to write an answer that explains the implicit or explicit false premises. Not sure if you are interested in writing such an answer, but I would upvote one if it was given.
May
14
comment List of experiments contradicting the expected utility model
I completely disagree with @NickStauner, there is absolutely no way in which EUT fits with Cross Validated, and it is perfectly on topic here because psychology was central to forming behavioral economics, and early behavioral economics formed largely as a way to explain failures of EUT.
May
14
comment List of experiments contradicting the expected utility model
Also, it would be better if you expanded your question to be more self-contained for those that might not be familiar, by for instance giving a one sentence sketch of expected utility theory (because there are different levels of generality people use). I would also avoid "Most famous paradoxes" since that is a judgement call and experimental results are only 'paradoxical' if you make the mistake of assuming expected utility theory describes reality; just 'experiments contradicting EUT' seems more neutral.
May
14
comment List of experiments contradicting the expected utility model
@MartinVanderLinden I don't think a properly general St. Petersburg paradox is all that easy to step around; it requires a utility function that is bounded from above, which I almost never see in econ. For more, see the 4th paragraph of this blog post.
May
9
comment What is the mechanism explaining the effect of a positive attitude on immune system functioning?
Thanks for the reference @KeeganKeplinger, the reason that I was skeptical is that one would expect the placebo effect and positive attitude to work via the same mechanism, thus there is no clear way to do a placebo control for 'positivity' as you would for a drug. You could, however, design an experiment where every day the patient is asked to list and focus on the positive or negative (depending on which experimental group they are in) effects of their situation, and then compare the results of the two groups.
May
1
comment Does the Minnesota 12 steps model really produce an effective change in the treatment of drugs addictions?
@NickStauner I wish I could blame it on that, but I am on my laptop and it was just me doing too many things at once and not paying attention to what my fingers were typing. It is pretty common for me.
May
1
comment Does the Minnesota 12 steps model really produce an effective change in the treatment of drugs addictions?
Your question received a lot of close votes for "unclear what you are asking". I have tried to restructure your post, isolated the questions from the background, added more tags, and a link. If I changed the intent of your question then please roll-back or make more edits. You also make a claim in your question ("its duration is also too short to do it") without any evidence. Please provide a reference for this claim, or remove it.
May
1
comment Theoretical grounding for Agile/Scrum methodologies in software development
The people who voted to close (one of them has withdrawn their vote since the edits), voted it as "unclear what you are asking". Hopefully this has clarified it for them.
Apr
17
comment Is the Orch-OR Penrose-Hameroff model for consciousness sensible?
@remDup okay. I will close this question as a duplicate of the first one. After you read those friends, if you have further questions then feel free to ask a new question or edit this one with further clarifications (if you edit then flag the question after editing so I know you want it reopened).
Apr
16
comment Is the Orch-OR Penrose-Hameroff model for consciousness sensible?
As @KeeganKeplinger mentions, can you explain why this discussion doesn't answer you? If you want to read further then maybe this reddit discussion and my blog post might guide you as to why people usually don't usually seriously consider Penrose & Hameroff.
Apr
14
comment How to compare tasks completed by neural architectures objectively?
This is a nice question. One approach is to go as you are proposing from the direction of task difficulty, a dual idea would be to look at the complexity of the neural networks that solve the tasks. For that you might find this CogSci question and this cstheory question useful.
Apr
9
comment References for biologically plausible models of knowledge representation?
@Seanny123 I wasn't suggesting characterizing it as such. I was just giving examples of questions that are "how biologically plausible is x?" or "what are the downsides of x?" and x just happened to be bayesian models because those are posts I happened to remember.
Apr
9
comment References for biologically plausible models of knowledge representation?
@Seanny123 your comment could be turned into a separate question on the biological feasibility of VSA. Kind of like similar but more broad questions for biological plausibility and other downsides and limitations of bayesian models.
Mar
6
comment Overview of Pitts & McCullough (1943) “A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous activity”
I will look into having your previous accounts merged into this one. Thank you for registering.
Mar
5
comment Overview of Pitts & McCullough (1943) “A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous activity”
You have at least three seperate accounts: 1, 2, 3. All of them are unregistered, if you register an account then we can merge all of them together which will allow you to more fully participate in this StackExchange.
Mar
5
comment Overview of Pitts & McCullough (1943) “A logical calculus of the ideas immanent in nervous activity”
Their paper is cited by many as the first introduction of deterministic finite state automata into computer science (although in my opinion some work in idustrial engineering preceeds this). Thus it is very important for the history of CS; I don't think it is nearly as important for neuroscience, unfortunately :(.
Mar
4
comment Does explaining a visual guidance system affect visual attention distribution?
When this leaves testing, and is used with (I assume) student drivers, will it be explained to them? Or are you just trying to use this in a study to learn how people scan normally and giving the cues as an "aha! I gotcha! There was danger here!"?
Mar
3
comment How does human brain pick out the most likely representation of object when an object is ambiguous?
How is feature recognition any different from voting of different networks? What do you think recognizes the features? Or do you literally believe that there is a "potato" and a "grenade" neural network in your brain that is somehow distinct from the "networks for other objects"? Finally, is it possible to remove the images? They don't add anything to the question except length.