6,468 reputation
233103
bio website cs.mcgill.ca/~akazna
location Montreal, Canada
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen 30 mins ago

From the School of Computer Science and Department of Psychology at McGill University, I marvel at the world through algorithmic lenses. My specific interests are in quantum computing, evolutionary game theory, modern evolutionary synthesis, and theoretical cognitive science. Previously I was at the Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Combinatorics & Optimization at the University of Waterloo and a visitor to the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore.


May
7
comment Is it possible for humans to conceive of being dead?
Could you include a reference to the study mentioned in point 3? (As in, does Cave include a proper reference at the back of the book or the footnote?)
May
7
comment Is it possible for humans to conceive of being dead?
I don't understand how this answer goes beyond the reasoning employed by Cave and already quoted in the question. The only thing that is not in the question is a suggested "exercise", which I don't see as any more likely to produce results that 'imagine your own death' and the suggestion to poll people that have been clinically dead. If you included links to studies that have done either and analyzed the results, then the answer would be more than just speculation.
May
7
comment How to estimate IQ for public figures?
I don't think this is really an answer, and could be easily summarized as a comment: "use statistics and bayesian inference". This could be an answer if you provided some sources for how to obtain reasonable priors (instead of taking a random personal guess) or even a complete model. At this point you are just stating the obvious (which is more or less done in the question body): gather information and conclude the most likely IQ.
May
7
comment Does individual work performance follow a Paretian distribution?
There is a nice NPR piece on this research and G+ discussion for those that want a quick summary. I also find the connection between power-laws of degree distribution in network formation (via preferential attachment, etc) and these performance results too close for comfort. Is there a more meaningful connection between the two?
Apr
29
comment Can an individual having strong identity associations with groups be used to infer anything about them?
thanks! It is great to see people investing in their questions. I hope someone knowledgeable on this topic comes across the question soon and helps you answer it!
Apr
29
comment Can an individual having strong identity associations with groups be used to infer anything about them?
Yeah, after reading your question, I gathered you were not interested in a specific group. I am just suggesting that some people might not get that at first (I didn't get it until a careful reading of the question, for instance). Also, phrasing the converse might give you more search terms, but you probably tried those already.
Apr
29
comment What is the role of traveling waves in circuit formation during cortical development?
My answer on how spiking begins in the fetus might be relevant. I am not knowledgeable enough to adapt it to an answer to this question, though.
Apr
29
comment How does neural spiking begin in the fetus?
Thank you @ChuckSherrington I was on a voting spree last night and came across this question again. Hopefully the answer is still useful to OP. I am not sure if I completely answer the question, though.
Apr
29
comment Does the fusiform face area in patients with Prosopagnosia (face blindness) show lower activity under an fMRI?
@JoshGitlin if you have a specific question about a specific part of a paper maybe you should ask it as a whole new question :D
Apr
29
comment Can an individual having strong identity associations with groups be used to infer anything about them?
I think this question is confusing, because a tempting answer would be "if a person strongly identifies with group A, then they are more likely to have typical traits of people from group A". However, that is not what you want to ask. A potential solution is to ask the flip question: "What can be said about individuals who do not have strong group associations?" I feel that this might make your question more clear (at least to me) and the answer to it might still be enlightening/of interest to you.
Apr
29
comment Do victims of parental abuse and neglect become abusive or neglectful parents?
@essbeev I tried to edit your question to focus on question (a) and remove the allied queries since it is best to focus on one question per question. I still think you need to be much more careful with what you mean by 'bad parenting'. Your current definition "any sort of behavior which would lead to mental disorders of any kind" is both vague and in some weird way self-fulfilling. If bad parenting is only when you cause mental disorders, then your question is effectively asking: "are people with mental disorders more likely to cause mental disorders in their offspring?"
Apr
29
comment How are newly created neurons recruited into existing networks?
I don't understand your first point. You start with "it is random in the local region" but end with "the general connection statistics of a newborn neuron will ultimately be similar to a neighboring neuron"? Which is it? Random connections and preferential attachment tend to produce very different network structures. I also agree with @ChuckSherrington and would prefer if you included some references for people like me that are not familiar with neuroscience.
Apr
29
comment How is motivation influenced by chance of reward?
Could you include more specific reference for support of the somatic marker hypothesis?
Apr
29
comment How to get rid of subvocalization?
I agree with H.Muster and @zergylord, I think it would be great if you could include some reference to take this answer beyond anecdotal if you can.
Apr
29
comment Is Decision-Making Emotionally Based, with Rationalization as the only Conscious Component?
can you expand your answer give a more specific summary of the paper and how it addresses this question than just the abstract?
Apr
27
comment Is there a reduction of “Brain Fog” with fewer hours of sleep?
You might be interested in looking around at the research on sleep inertia. This might be the term you are looking for, and then the relevant theories will be based on which stage of sleep you wake up in.
Apr
17
comment Neural networks with biologically plausible accounts of neurogenesis
@MattMunson thanks for your answer. I was actually organizing an online reading group on neurogenesis with some colleagues so that we could start seriously thinking about some of these questions. Unfortunately everything got delayed because there were a few other projects ahead in the queue. If you are interested in the reading group then send me an email.
Apr
16
comment Neural networks with biologically plausible accounts of neurogenesis
@ChrisS unfortunately this not on-topic on cstheory, and I would not want to ask it there. Thanks for catching the dead link!
Apr
15
comment How is the Stanford Prison Experiment connected to Conformity?
An earlier question on the connection between cognitive-psychology and the SPE might be of interest.
Apr
14
comment Is there a random walk theory that can account for situations with more than two choices?
Good reference, could you expand your answer a little bit on the core ideas of their model?