6,693 reputation
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bio website cs.mcgill.ca/~akazna
location Montreal, Canada
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen yesterday

From the School of Computer Science and Department of Psychology at McGill University, I marvel at the world through algorithmic lenses. My specific interests are in quantum computing, evolutionary game theory, modern evolutionary synthesis, and theoretical cognitive science. Previously I was at the Institute for Quantum Computing and Department of Combinatorics & Optimization at the University of Waterloo and a visitor to the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore.


May
24
comment Visual search: complexity of positive vs negative search tasks
@H.Muster not-X is almost always a more difficult task than X.
May
24
comment How does a researcher typically go about conducting a survey-based psychological experiment?
I also moved the motivation after the question, since you suggested that you want general info, not high-heels specific. If you feel this is inappropriate, you can always roll-back my edits.
May
24
comment How does a researcher typically go about conducting a survey-based psychological experiment?
I think the securing funding part is a completely separate question. I don't see what would be special about a survey-type experiment in terms of securing funding (except that you need much less funding). The appropriate-design of the experiment cannot be answered without knowing which experiment you want to conduct and what you expect to measure.
May
24
comment Visual search: complexity of positive vs negative search tasks
@H.Muster I am not saying she explained it in terms of task difficulties, I am suggesting that her work makes my assumption "a reasonable one". In that there are two types of processing observed: highly parallel pre-attentive and serial post-attentive. I think my answer is structured pretty poorly right now, and I will try to restructure by moving the Treisman answer to the top and my conjecturing and analogies below.
May
24
comment Visual search: complexity of positive vs negative search tasks
this is not a fair comparison between human and computer. You are allowing a human to do parallel processing in the first case by saying "thus can be seen immediately" while you force the computer to do only sequential processing. This would be a poor model.
May
24
comment Do only humans spend a lot of time daydreaming (or having “stimulus-independent thoughts”)?
can you give a quick summary of what the Suddendorf & Corballis group typically conclude?
May
24
comment Is it possible to distinguish recall and calculation?
@fgregg sometimes the types/frequency of mistakes can be used to understand how individuals represent/process information (apart from timing data). The most famous example of this is the study of how beginner versus expert chess players memorize and recall chess positions. On real-game boards: beginners make simple swap mistakes and experts make formation mistakes --- suggesting that experts chunk and memorize on the level of formation, while beginners do so on the level of individual pieces. Note that when a random non-real-game position is given, both experts and beginners do equally poorly.
May
23
comment When is it best to use PsycINFO versus Google Scholar?
do we really need all these new tags? research-process, literature-review, publication-process, and university-training. I think this is far too many tags about doing research. There should be just one tag for that. Also, the lit-review tag is too easy to confuse with the much more established reference-request.
May
19
comment How do you refer to something in APA-style that is not submitted to be published?
@Jeff that would be a better fit that cogsci, in my opinion. But we should check with their mods.
May
18
comment How do you refer to something in APA-style that is not submitted to be published?
I don't think this question is on-topic. Although questions about the publication-process specific to cogsci/psych are on-topic, this is just a general and easy-to-search question about the APA style. We do not want to become a reference site for APA style. Also, I believe this does not meet standards of initial research
May
18
comment Spurious attractors in Hopfield networks
Thanks for asking this question! Minor comment: question 3 is a pretty big question on its own, and not as closely related to question 1 and 2. It might be worthwhile to ask it as a separate question, but it is up to you.
May
17
comment Are there any journal articles in psychology that have promoted and discussed reproducible data analysis?
It is PLoS (Public Library of Science) and it is not a journal, but it publishes several journals that have names that start with PLoS. None of these journals are psychology specific. Further, these journals don't "claim to be 'open-access'". They basically defined what it means to be open-access. However, I have not heard of them trying to promote reproducible data analysis, especially in psychology (they concentrate on bio and medicine mostly, although PLoS One does publish some other things); I don't see how your last paragraph has relevance.
May
15
comment Do high heels increase female attractiveness in men only through indirect means?
I imagine that standing on a slope would produce a different posture than standing in high heels (not to mention wanting photos mid-gait, etc). With what I was suggesting, you can just use the same photos and just crop out the part where the feet appear (or use photoshop magic to place some object to obscure the feet).
May
15
comment Do high heels increase female attractiveness in men only through indirect means?
Yes, I understood the question. If the foot is not visible, the posture still is. If you see the same amount of change from no-high-heel foot-not-visible to yes-high-heel foot-not-visibile as you see from no-high-heel foot-visible to yes-high-heel foot-visible then you can argue that the actual aesthetics of the shoe itself do not matter.
May
15
comment Do high heels increase female attractiveness in men only through indirect means?
or just provide some participants with pictures where the foot is not visible, some where it is (and also cases with and without high heels)
May
14
comment Are there any connectionist models that integrate reinforcement and fully supervised learning?
If you are still pursuing this question, CS.SE might be a great place to ask a follow up question.
May
14
comment Does self-rated performance predict objective performance over and above other-rated performance?
I am guessing attractiveness is not a domain-specific performance of the type you are looking for. However, for attractiveness there is huge inaccuracy in self-rating compared to others-ratings and there is a pretty big gender difference; men are much worse at self-rating than women (see the 4th paragraph of this answer for details/references)
May
13
comment What types of sounds do young infants prefer?
It seems that the preference for mother's voice develops in the fetus at about 32-34 weeks after gestation.
May
13
comment Physiological differences between brains of Conservatives and Liberals
Could you include a proper reference (or link) to the article you mention, and not just the name? Also, that study was done in 2007, and has been cited 136 times, have you done a forward search on Google Scholar?
May
13
comment Phenomenon that causes music to sound like it's being played at a different tempo than remembered?
It is always better to explain what you know about the process already in your question, and if you don't know anything about it then do a little bit of initial research to better frame your question.