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Jun
19
comment Neurotransmitter based imaging techniques
I like this answer, will take a look at the paper once I am behind paywall. Is there any fundamental constrain on improving the spatial resolution, or is it low simply because they have not had the time to develop better resolution techniques for this approach?
Jun
19
comment Neurotransmitter based imaging techniques
@ChuckSherrington sure, although preferable non-invasive ones and not ones where we mess with genome to insert weird trackers. However, if that is the only alternative then better than no answer!
Jun
19
comment Appropriate metric(s) for quantifying the accuracy gain obtained from averaging dyads of estimates instead of adopting individual estimates?
@user1205901 my bad, I didn't read closely enough.
Jun
19
comment Appropriate metric(s) for quantifying the accuracy gain obtained from averaging dyads of estimates instead of adopting individual estimates?
@user1205901 you should ask the question in your comment as a separate question. It is distinct enough from your current question which doesn't talk about averaging multiple estimates within one individual.
Jun
19
comment How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?
@JeromyAnglim no problem, but I made some more edits, because I don't understand where the OP gets the idea that D&C don't model memory.
Jun
19
comment How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?
Also @user865 I just skimmed through D&C91. How does it not capture the role of memory? That seems to be the exact thing they study, and they model memory as clusters of activation in a neural network and not as an arbitrary database that remembers everything.
Jun
19
comment How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?
@JeromyAnglim the edits you made make part of my answer look silly, and are a significant change to the original question.
Jun
18
comment How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?
next time you should include such details in your question (although editing it in now would be a pretty big change to the question). However, take a close look at Kaplan et al. (2006). Hopfield nets are pretty bad at remembering things, and so this approach might be what you are looking for.
Jun
18
comment What cognitive strategies diminish bias in decision-making beyond those outlined by Larrick?
"Can readers think of" is not a good fit for a Q&A website and seems more like an invitation for discussion, which StackExchange was not built for. Please restate your two last questions in more objective language.
Jun
18
comment How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?
What paradigm are you working in, and why does the first result in Google Scholar (Dehaene & Changeux, 1991) not answer your question? Also, what is your reason for believing it is hard to model?
Jun
17
comment What do the super-large brains of whales and elephants map to?
I think you need to cite your use of 'evolutionary cost'. I have never come across such a term in evolutionary biology. Evolution does not 'exert effort' to refine features. There is either a selective pressure of a feature or not, and relevant random mutations either happen or don't. In a sexual population many mutations can fixate in a population at the same time and so there is no effort to be divided up. Everything can be 'done' in parallel.
Jun
17
comment Does the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis apply to artificial (specifically programming) languages?
+ 1 Good answer, but why is causality difficult to test for? You can study child behavior before they learn to program and then after, and have a control group that isn't taught to program. Sure it doesn't uncover a neural mechanism but that isn't necessary to establish causality in psychology.
Jun
16
comment How long does it take to read a sentence with X number of characters?
@J.R. I think your answer is fine, you state the important features (that words matter more than characters) and that is is weird to expect sub-linear. However, if you feel inclined to expand your answer with more background on the psychology of reading, then that would be super!
Jun
16
comment How long does it take to read a sentence with X number of characters?
I made a significant edit to the question to make it focus on the scientific aspect of the question. Please edit the UX version to focus on the UX-part and not be a copy-and-paste of the original Q. If you think I changed the spirit too much, feel free to roll-back my edits, but keep in mind we are not UX and prefer scientific questions.
Jun
15
comment What was the experiment where you pour liquid from a tall container to a short one and ask a child which has more?
A must see video of this in action
Jun
15
comment Measuring changes in hemispheric dominance over time
Can you integrate some of the initial research you did into your question and what you have concluded so far? I am assuming you are not looking for questionairs like this as your answer.
Jun
14
comment What causes people to feel depressed without there being a problem?
You should take a look at this question about endogenous versus exogenous reasoning in depression diagnosis. Your question might in-fact be a duplicate of that, but I haven't thought too closely about it.
Jun
14
comment Where is the visual “image” that we “see” finally assembled?
@bfrs then why are you using words like 'assembled' and asking questions like "where is the image?" When I say you are making the homunculus fallacy, I am not suggesting you think there is a little man inside our heads. What I am suggesting is that you think the experience of sight is somehow assembled in one place to be 'viewed' or take in by some other place. The whole point is that this does not happen, there is constant feedback both ways and a lot of things are done in parallel or are distributed so that you can damage parts of your visual scene but not all of it.
Jun
14
comment Where is the visual “image” that we “see” finally assembled?
I've referred you to this question before, please consult it and the answers to avoid any misconceptions in your final paragraph. Also, please be more careful with your terminology, it seems your confusion in this (and your previous question) both originate from you using "image that we see" as if the brain sees an image.
Jun
13
comment Why do participants prefer to give input values that are “round numbers”?
From my arm-chair it seems that the tendency is based on folk notion of sig-figs. If I say 10 without any further qualification as the magnitude of something, it is usually assumed to be $10 \pm 5$. I think when most people say 15 the also mean $15 \pm 2.5$, etc. When I say 11 though then I probably mean $11 \pm 0.5$.