1,406 reputation
727
bio website migdal.wikidot.com/en
location Castelldefels, Spain
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Oct 14 at 13:33

A PhD student in Theoretical Quantum Optics at ICFO. Alumnus of Physics and Mathematics at the University of Warsaw. Interested in quantum optics & quantum information, applied optics and mathematical modeling in psychology. Dedicated to education of gifted schoolchildren (as both tutor and organizer). In free time enjoys photography, hiking and psychology (esp. cognitive science).


Jun
16
comment Do only humans spend a lot of time daydreaming (or having “stimulus-independent thoughts”)?
You claim that animals live in the present and do not daydream. Do you have any other proof for that (other than your personal opinion)? For example, I do not know what happens in the dog's mind.
Jun
15
comment Do only humans spend a lot of time daydreaming (or having “stimulus-independent thoughts”)?
You make a claim. Do you have any scientific arguments supporting it?
Apr
2
comment How are personality traits “encoded” in the brain?
Its two questions, could you split it? (Knowing how something is encoded does not mean that we know how to change it. For example, we know that some diseases are "encoded" in viri, but we cannot cure them.)
Mar
29
comment Need a definition of Cognitive Simplicity (or Complexity) that would appeal to a wide audience
Plus, scholar.google.com with cognitive complexity "website design" yield in some potentially interesting results.
Mar
29
comment Need a definition of Cognitive Simplicity (or Complexity) that would appeal to a wide audience
This is... a complex question. If you are looking for a "number for corporate strategists" then invent anything, it won't have sense anyway. To have something which make more sense, try looking at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychology_of_art#Complexity_2. But for a website, I would look at time that it takes for a user to accomplish what they want. (It is not only about number of elements, but also - if they are put in meaningful/intuitive places.) Of course it cannot be done without measurement (but you can have some intuitions behind it).
Mar
5
comment Why do higher incentives lead to lower performance for non-rudimentary tasks?
@David Of course, very likely, how you frame the problem is very important (through, it is another variable).
Feb
26
comment How much alcohol is negative for brain function?
How this "to the amount of damage, and that every glass per week counts" is compatible with positive correlation of (moderate) alcohol consumption and intelligence? Also: Online games offer trove of brain data and cited therein The largest human cognitive performance dataset reveals insights into the effects of lifestyle factors and aging - esp Fig 2.
Feb
26
comment Why do higher incentives lead to lower performance for non-rudimentary tasks?
@David The whole point is that the difference was not into suggesting tools, but just putting more higher incentives. That is, sating that "one should solve a customer's problem in a way that is maintainable, practical, long-term, etc" but putting a lot of pressure, incentives or giving little time will likely produce not so much thinking outside of the box.
Jan
30
comment Does the scarcity of female programmers, suggest that men are more intelligent than women?
@JeromyAnglim My objections are not related to the question subject (I don't care much for political correctness or being polite), but the lack of research/effort by OP (at least starting with wikipedia, any job census or whatever - it is not a niche problem!). But TU for you - great answer to a so-so question!
Jan
29
comment Does the scarcity of female programmers, suggest that men are more intelligent than women?
It is certainly a different question, not necessarily a better one. "statistically provable scarcity of women" but a link to an essay? Why other remarks or question - there should be ONE question per question. Plus, in general, before asking here some proof of initial research is welcome.
Jan
16
comment How does syntax highlighting affect the learning of a new programming language?
Although it is not a direct answer, you may want to look at Using Eye-Tracking to Understand Program Comprehension.
Jan
14
comment How many calories do we burn when we try to understand mathematical proofs?
See question How does the brain's energy consumption depend on mental activity? - biologySE.
Dec
26
comment Why do humans have sex in private?
Well, things like "we see stronger chimps beating up weaker chimps that have consensual sex" are factual statements (so referencing them would be desirable). In evolution it is easy to come up with a solution, but hard to check if it is actually correct (opposite of mathematics); plus, in empirical sciences reasoning without empiricism does not work. (But sure, there is no "no original research" policy, so of course, you are encouraged for your writing your hypotheses.)
Dec
25
comment Why do humans have sex in private?
It sounds plausible, but do you have any reference to back it? (Also, while it is not an official requirement, slightly more formal style is being preferred. (E.g. less rhetorical questions and colloquialisms.))
Jun
27
comment Does intelligence cause greater alcohol consumption?
The relations seems to be more tricky (see nature.com/news/online-games-offer-trove-of-brain-data-1.13247 and links there), with intelligence peaking at 1-2 drinks per day (and it is, AFAIK, without controlling for other parameters). However, excluding other social, health (e.g. some people cannot drink because of some diseases) or psychological (e.g. related to stress or creativity-depression link) correlations may be hard. BTW: Do you know any tests with control (especially double blind)? Or any possible mechanisms than may make alcohol boosting intelligence?
May
17
comment How is intelligence correlated to beauty?
And by the same author: Why beautiful people are more intelligent (free pdf). And as a side note, slides of my friend on that topic. There are also some links to paper investigating the beauty-symmetry relationship.
Apr
22
comment Is there experimental support for John Perry's “Theory of Structured Procrastination”?
@ArtemKaznatcheev Here it is: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candle_problem - making haste makes it harder to come with a creative solution. It is not that unlikely that the converse is also true: to make creative things one needs to not rush so quickly and make his/her mind wander (NB which makes one unhappy, see scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=a-wandering-mind-is-an-un), where procrastination is a side effect (or perhaps not even - just a natural phenomenon in creativity, or (sic!) well-spent time).
Apr
22
comment Is there experimental support for John Perry's “Theory of Structured Procrastination”?
It may be hard to measure it, as procrastination involves mainly creative, open-ended work, as opposed to work than "can be done" [citation needed; I had it somewhere]. So, for example, you can say that X produces 5 papers, but Y produces only 1 paper in a year. But it might be hard to asses creativity or value of the papers.
Apr
11
comment What psychological factors account for code readability?
A related link, on eye-tracking when reading code: blog.theincredibleholk.org/blog/2012/12/18/how-do-we-read-code
Mar
12
comment How to explain emoticons to an autistic person?
So, the actual problem is in explaining emoticons or emotions?