1,366 reputation
725
bio website migdal.wikidot.com/en
location Castelldefels, Spain
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Apr 8 at 18:01

A PhD student in Theoretical Quantum Optics at ICFO. Alumnus of Physics and Mathematics at the University of Warsaw. Interested in quantum optics & quantum information, applied optics and mathematical modeling in psychology. Dedicated to education of gifted schoolchildren (as both tutor and organizer). In free time enjoys photography, hiking and psychology (esp. cognitive science).


Aug
19
comment Is there any Personality theory that uses scientific methodology instead of subjective interpretations?
@ForbiddenOverseer "Purely based on scientific grounds" is not a well-defined statement. Intuition is an intrinsic part of science and you cannot go without it (you need to ground every theory somewhere). Perhaps what you mean is personality traits based less on ah hoc assumptions.
Jul
2
comment Is the Neanderthal Theory of Autistic brain a reasonable scientific theory?
Avoiding eye contact: who have proven that Neanderthals do it? When it comes to aggression: go into an elevator with strangers and see if neurotypicals are searching for the eye contact :). There are other thing more that speculative.
Jun
11
comment Can one “understand” emotions, yet not “feel” them?
This thing is know as Mary's room, when talking about senses (not feelings); but the problems are largely equivalent.
Jun
10
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
9
revised Why is it easier to remember the correct response for problems with many options rather than just two?
added 11 characters in body
Jun
9
answered Why is it easier to remember the correct response for problems with many options rather than just two?
Jun
9
comment Why is it easier to remember the correct response for problems with many options rather than just two?
As a side not, computational analogues (esp. number of bits) can be very misleading when it comes to human mind.
Jun
9
comment Why is it easier to remember the correct response for problems with many options rather than just two?
The question seems to have nothing to do with long vs short term memory.
Jun
3
comment For depression diagnoses, does one make a clear distinction between endogenous and exogenous causes of depression?
+1 for a nice question, but I don't understand if you care for the distinction inside-outside or brain-mind. For example, does (lack of) performing psychical activity or exposure to sunlight count as your "exogenous" or "exogenous"? Most likely, most of the time causes are combined. However, I am very interesting in more solid findings.
May
25
awarded  Benefactor
May
24
awarded  Nice Question
May
21
comment Performance of a group solving a cognitive task: How does it scale?
@H.Muster Not exactly. I put some assumptions that don't need to hold in the general context, but are motivated by some particular experimental outcomes. So even for 2AFC task one can came with a more general model (however, personally I would like rather to test/focus on a particular example, than generalize it even further).
May
21
comment Performance of a group solving a cognitive task: How does it scale?
But anyway, thanks and +1 :). (Though I clarified in the question, that I am the most interested in low-level task; a grade for the total research output, being a complex process by itself, is hardly low-level.)
May
21
revised Performance of a group solving a cognitive task: How does it scale?
added clarification
May
21
comment Performance of a group solving a cognitive task: How does it scale?
@H.Muster My paper (thx, btw) deals with a specific 2AFC task and gives only theoretical predictions (but two of co-authors are now doing experimental part). I'm interested if there is known scaling of efficiency any other low-level tasks (e.g. solving a word puzzle, solving a multiple choice test, signal detection, counting the number of blobs...). I am curious if there are experimental results that either are compatible with my results, or undermine it.
May
21
comment Performance of a group solving a cognitive task: How does it scale?
I am aware of that paper, and actually I like it very much (and had nice discussion with an author, and even used it as an example on academia.SE). However, scaling is quadratic/linear, depending on the group size. And discipline changes only critical group size, not the scaling properties (which may be more a subject of social interactions + some hidden factors correlating group size and a measure of performance).
May
20
revised Do only humans spend a lot of time daydreaming (or having “stimulus-independent thoughts”)?
added 24 characters in body
May
20
asked Do only humans spend a lot of time daydreaming (or having “stimulus-independent thoughts”)?
May
18
awarded  Promoter
Apr
20
accepted What is the current status of tetrachromacy in humans?