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seen Jun 15 '13 at 20:51

Feb
1
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
Here is a curious thing for you, Steven Jeuris. When I went and looked up Eigen's book on Amazon I saw the cover that I remembered and instantly knew it was not that book, but another, that I had gotten this fact from. I can vaguely recall the cover of the book in question, but that is all. Seeing the cover of Laws of the Game I remember was enough to allow me to know it was that other book. Weird. Hence, I did not add it to the question.
Feb
1
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
He will remember what worked and start there next time, even if it is just to ask for the other drumstick. He won't know why what he did worked and he won't be too concerned about it and it will become part of the larger language because it works. This is, apparently, why pronouns have gender, for example. To add another data point for the listener when trying to decipher noisy signal. My curiosity was to find out what the field thought about this and to find some author names or key words to search. A lot of the time that is the hardest part for a non-initiate.
Feb
1
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
(I don't presume to tell you your field, just setting up my point) I suspect Zipf comes from a generation that imagined language being worked out by gray men sitting in libraries. I imagine a hunter shouting over screeching birds and water falling that his partner should look out for that big bear just behind him. He isn't worried about who's responsibility it is to provide the information or decode it. He just wants to save his friends life and will continue shouting things until he gets noticed.
Feb
1
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
Zipf's scheme looks more like the set up for a thought experiment than a description of reality. Embedded redundancy used for error correction would be something that emerged over generations through uncouncious (?) experimentation by a whole continent of speakers working to understand each other in life or death situations.
Feb
1
comment Is there sub-conscious error correction in interpreting heard language?
It is a positive use of ambiguity, no?
Feb
1
comment Is there sub-conscious error correction in interpreting heard language?
Sort of feel that my use of sub-conscious is entirely appropriate here since it reveals my status as a non-initiate.
Feb
1
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
I can't comment on your other question so I will leave this here. I have never read this book, but Brian Eno used to talk about it a lot and it was quite well known in the good old modern era. It is Seven Types of Ambiguity from 1930. An exercise in attempting to classify metaphor. amazon.com/Seven-Types-Ambiguity-William-Empson/dp/081120037X/…
Jan
30
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
I am going to give Joel the green check. I am sure you have nailed the source of my initial exposure to this and I thank you for that. That it turns out to be Claude Shannon is very interesting because I realized that the notion has become a sort of received wisdom that has been repeated by a lot of pop and legitimate science writers. His work was about written language, though, so it does not actually support my long held belief in instantaneous error correction. I am going to formulate another question.
Jan
29
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
Yes, i agree, Steven. It would be more relevant to my question if the research involved spoken English. The Shannon experiment sounds more like solving a crossword puzzle, a very conscious act.
Jan
29
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
I read a little about this experiment of Shannon's. Do you think it would hold up to present day standards? I am sure that Wolfram is referring to Shannon. I wonder if there is any current science on the subject.
Jan
29
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
Holy wow, Shannon and Wolfram. Nice work.
Jan
29
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
It was "Laws of the Game : How the Principles of Nature Govern Chance" by Manfred Eigen and Ruthild Winkler. It is from 30 years ago, so the idea may have come from some other book I read at the time.
Jan
29
comment Is there a lot of redundancy in written and spoken language?
I think it was called Rules of the Game. It was about self organizing systems. I have it buried in a box. Amazon has many books under that name, can't remember the authors name, couldn't find it.
Dec
14
comment Difference between parallel processing done by human brain and by computers
I would like to add the idea that even computers can not break down some tasks to multiple threads. Tasks which are made up of many individual calculations can be broken down to be operated on by many processors. Rendering, filtering, modeling are all amenable to multi core processing. Individual calculations can't be broken down, so a process that consists of many calculations serially can't be broken down. One of the things that can only occupy one thread is communicating with the user.
Dec
14
comment Difference between parallel processing done by human brain and by computers
This would suggest the bottleneck is the fact that you have only one consciousness. The brain does use multi-threading, I assume, when image processing or modeling the future, but we only get the results posted to the conscious mind as images or emotions. The conscious mind can only do one thing at a time and our sense of ourselves is the sum of those things we are conscious of being in control of.