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525
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location Redwood City, CA
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Sep 15 at 23:07

1st first PhD student in Psychology at Stanford under Professor Jay McClelland. All neural network modeling, all of the time.


Oct
28
awarded  Taxonomist
Oct
2
comment 'Model-free' learning in humans
Thanks Chuck! I agree that the question in the current form is answered via CHCH's article. Possible next steps: 1.Delete question and wait to post the inevitable follow up question. 2. I could Community Wiki it and then answer with a blurb from the article (unless CHCH wants to for the credit) 3. I could (as soon as properly formulated) modify the question to something more in depth since the terminology question was so easily answered. I'd prefer option 2, but I thought I'd ask as maybe the community has some procedure that people have agreed upon.
Oct
2
comment 'Model-free' learning in humans
Sorry about the google miss -- this was question I rediscovered from a few years ago. I should've regoogled before posting, but I didn't realize that something would have changed in a couple years. Sorry for the mishap. However, I don't understand how this isn't a question. What part could use rewording?
Oct
1
asked 'Model-free' learning in humans
Oct
1
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
20
comment What form might Jungian archetypes take in the brain?
Interesting answer; sounds very well informed on Jung. However, I think the term "sparse representation" is being misused here. "Grandmother cells" are synonymous with local representations. Sparse representations are still distributed; they just tend have most of their units inactive at any given instant.
Jun
14
comment What form might Jungian archetypes take in the brain?
Perhaps I'm missing something, but it strikes me as very odd to presuppose that archetypes have a direct sensory representation. Jung's archetypes were very abstract, high level concepts, so I'd venture to guess that they'd be stored in brain regions associated with semantic cognition. Just a guess though, as I haven't heard anything in the recent literature on any Jungian constructs.
Apr
27
comment How to get rid of subvocalization?
I agree, and vaguely remember speed reading tricks of this sort as being debunked. I'll try and look up some citations if I get a chance.
Mar
27
comment Biological plausibility of bayesian models of cognition
I think one problem with this question is that bayesian models work on a completely different level of abstraction than neuroscience data. Any data can be interpreted as being optimal for something
Mar
7
comment What is the effect of merely expecting an interruption on performance?
Could you give an example task where interruption comes into play? I'm asking because 'interruption' could mean different things to different subfields of cognitive science. Anything from perceptual masking all the way up to having a confederate verbally cutoff the subject could be considered interruption.
Mar
7
comment Combinatorial woes
Welcome to the site Vlad! This is a great question, but it'd be even better if you could link to some of your sources. Also, you might want to change the name of your question to something more descriptive such as a combination of some of your closing remarks (e.g. How does chunk formation avoid a combinatorial explosion?).
Mar
1
revised Why is it common for people to default to a single causal source to explain new phenomena?
formatted out some unscientific flavor text.
Mar
1
comment Why is it common for people to default to a single causal source to explain new phenomena?
I made a few edits, though some more might still be necessary. Its shaping up to be a good question so don't give up hope :-)
Mar
1
suggested suggested edit on Why is it common for people to default to a single causal source to explain new phenomena?
Mar
1
comment Why is it common for people to default to a single causal source to explain new phenomena?
Interesting question, but I'd advise rewording it to be more scientific and less inflammatory (e.g. "Why is it common for people to default to a single causal source to explain new phenomena?"). The current question is amusingly worded, but isn't helping us attract experts to the site, or motivate existing experts to answer it in a well researched fashion.
Mar
1
comment Are there any cognitive test (or test suites) available on the iPad?
Perhaps I'm ignorant to the latest software, but I'd assume most web-based testing isn't great for getting reaction times. Some apps that can do E-prime style reaction time experiments would be most interesting.
Feb
28
accepted How do humans control saccades?
Feb
28
accepted What is the psychology behind trolling?
Feb
28
accepted How does the brain act on the information gained via eye saccades?
Feb
27
comment How does the brain act on the information gained via eye saccades?
Thanks for the answer! Been looking for the right term to use when searching papers, "trans-saccadic integration" fits the bill nicely :)