1,055 reputation
528
bio website
location Redwood City, CA
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Dec 5 at 20:08

1st first PhD student in Psychology at Stanford under Professor Jay McClelland. All neural network modeling, all of the time.


Jun
10
comment What is the null hypothesis, when there is no research hypothesis?
This seems way out of scope... philosopy S.E. might be a better place, since this deals more with the philosophy of science rather any particular field.
Jun
5
comment How can schemas be applied to website design?
Hmm, the titular question is quite interesting, but the side questions (a-d) all seem very problematic. I don't mean to be overly harsh, but my answer to all of them would be: None of them are true, and I'm not sure what led you to think that they could be. You should unpack your current beliefs on what schema are, since it appears you might be working from some faulty premises.
May
20
comment Is there any recent work on modeling how we rapidly acquire new knowledge?
Also, "the brain processes information then encodes its conclusions into memory" -- that whole process is generally believed to involve either changing synaptic weights and/or neural activation patterns. Both of which can be (and generally are) modeled in artificial neural networks.
May
20
comment Is there any recent work on modeling how we rapidly acquire new knowledge?
Thanks for taking an interest in my question! However, I'm afraid I strongly disagree with the statements you've made in this answer. The vast majority of neural network models used in cognitive psychology aren't meant to take place over an evolutionary time scale. They are meant to model the learning processes going on during an individual's lifetime. I could site sources, but I think this fact is fairly well accepted.
May
18
asked Is there any recent work on modeling how we rapidly acquire new knowledge?
May
18
comment Aesthetic preference for even or odd numbers
Ah, that clarifies things, so you mean aesthetic preference? If so, making that explicit would be helpful. Also, you should try google scholaring "numeric aesthetic preferences" something similar to get some background.
May
17
comment What happens to a person's frontal lobes when they have a breakdown from stress?
I'd suggest changing the question to something akin to "what are the neural correlates of a mental breakdown" or even "Is a mental breakdown detectable at the neural level?" The current question presupposes the lobe granularity is the right one, which we shouldn't accept without some cited research.
May
17
comment Aesthetic preference for even or odd numbers
"Prefer" is too vague to be answered in a rigorous way. You should give some examples of what you mean by number preference or try and operationalize it in some other manner.
May
17
answered When can anchoring backfire?
May
14
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
19
answered What is the difference between psychophysics and neurophysiology?
Mar
27
accepted Any research on how we use visual category information in visuomotor tasks?
Mar
27
comment Any research on how we use visual category information in visuomotor tasks?
Wow, thanks for the great response! That Mahon quote was just the kind of thing I was looking for. Looks like I've got my readings for the next week :)
Mar
27
comment Any research on how we use visual category information in visuomotor tasks?
Good to be back :)
Mar
27
comment How to tell a diagnosis from an actual state?
Perhaps this is tad to philosophical, but could you give an example where we can separate a human construct from an 'actual state'?
Mar
26
asked Any research on how we use visual category information in visuomotor tasks?
Mar
20
comment EEG correlates of handedness
"It must have correlates in EEG" -- No. It must have some neural correlate. EEG can capture only a small percentage of behavioral phenomena due to its relatively course spatial frequency and inability to record activity in more medial brain regions. I'd broaden your search accordingly; perhaps that will lead to more relevant literature.
Mar
15
comment Any attempts at testing or modeling the 'cognitive conception' of language?
Just realized Gary Lupyan had the same advisor as me; small world!
Mar
15
accepted Any attempts at testing or modeling the 'cognitive conception' of language?
Mar
15
comment Any attempts at testing or modeling the 'cognitive conception' of language?
Having a CS degree, I very much realize that serial processing is much easier than massive parallelism for both computer hardware and software engineers to produce. My claim is that serial processing is harder for humans, not harder in some general sense. This is a somewhat controversial claim, but has support from evolutionary psychology (other animals are terrible at symbol processing) and neuro-anatomy (the brain is massively parallel).