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bio website twitter.com/#!/BenBrocka
location Iowa
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Nov 21 at 20:20

I'm a moderator on User Experience Stack Exchange. (That's right here!)

Programmer/Systems Analyst working mostly in PHP/HTML/CSS. Enthusiast follower of User Experience topics and solutions.


Mar
13
comment Under what conditions does 60hz video produce visual artifacts?
@jonsca if the problem is fixed with higher frequency rather than higher resolution or anti-aliasing, how could it be a matter of aliasing?
Mar
6
comment Asaccadia adaptation
Confused by your second paragraph, do you mean are fixations merely the optimal way to examine the world? Saccades are only the time when your eyes are moving when you are effectively blind, the fixation is when you "see"
Mar
5
comment Does any evidence show that Smartphone users have poorer memory?
Very interesting finding! I doubt that's all of the potential effects but I've certainly had this feeling in regards to my smartphone.
Feb
24
comment Are spaced flashcards effective for learning?
Very important point about not "dropping out" cards after a small number of correct recalls
Feb
23
comment How are newly created neurons recruited into existing networks?
Great answer, though as jonsca said, references would be ideal for support/further reading
Feb
22
comment What is the term for when too many choices results in inability to decide?
I was additionally planning to ask a question about the significance of it, but I had to know what to call it first
Feb
22
comment When is higher confidence predictive of less accuracy?
As a specific example, it can be seen in the articles referenced here, confidence in driving ability appears to show no significant correlation with accuracy.
Feb
22
comment What is the term for when too many choices results in inability to decide?
@AndyDeSoto the presumption of equal weight is probably very relevant; related to scanning the ability to filter out irrelevant options is very important. If you can't it may simply seem like all options are valid or that none of them are.
Feb
22
comment What is the term for when too many choices results in inability to decide?
Cognitive Load is certainly related but not quite specific enough. Cognitive load refers to any situation where WM is stressed, not just too many options halting the ability to make a decision
Feb
22
comment How does goal-tracking and sign-tracking behaviour vary across species?
Your question title is sorta asking two questions (examples + variance) but your question body only asks about variance; are you only interested in variation within/across species?
Feb
21
comment How can I find open access journals for cognitive science research?
@Jeff perhaps you're right there are few "reputable" journals out there, but turning this into a list of subjectively good journals fitting a criteria makes it even more subjective and less concrete question than even the initial question.
Feb
19
comment What is the current status of tetrachromacy in humans?
I've heard about this, I don't remember anything particularly interesting about it though. Fun fact is that chickens (I think many birds) are tetrachromats, though.
Feb
19
comment How to efficiently locate existing psychology and social science measures?
One of the simplest places to start is the Wikipedia category of Psychometrics
Feb
17
comment Simulate colorblindness in non-colorblind individuals
Not quite what I was looking for, but an even cooler tool is Chrometric, a full browser that lets you simulate colorblindness and other vision impairments.
Feb
17
comment What can cognitive psychology tell us about the results of the Stanford Prison Experiment?
@jonsca Social psych (all psych) is on topic here. Richiemorrisroe was probably just alluding to the fact you were asking in the context of cog psych.
Feb
16
comment What is Asperger's Syndrome?
I believe this has been more than adequately answered anyway, unless there is a more specific question.
Feb
16
comment Are there any laws of memory?
Much of the problem seems to be defining "law" here. One of those articles calls Gestalt Psychology a "law". Very few if any of the papers there could be considered as trying to find or propose a "law" as Roediger attempts to define it. Psychology works upon theories, which may or may not be generalized. "Law" is occasionally used to point to a specific apparently causal relationship but is not a formal, agreed upon thing in psych, nor is there a collection of "laws".
Feb
16
comment Are there any laws of memory?
Psychology really isn't a field where "universal laws" are used or evaluated. I think you're looking for something that, more generally, doesn't exist. I've never heard "laws of memory" used as a phrase or thing except in that one paper. The word law itself is certainly misleading if not a strawman.
Feb
16
comment What is Asperger's Syndrome?
It's been subsumed into Autism Spectrum disorder as of the current draft of the DSM V is the definition there not satisfactory?
Feb
14
comment What neurobiological changes are associated with the end of the critical period in children?
I don't have journal access so I wasn't able to check those out (unless someone is hosting them for free). I know it's not exactly what you asked about but there's lots of research into cochlear implants on the critical period and what changes are caused. Lots of the results are still relevant RE brain changes even if they're trying to find something CI related.