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seen Oct 8 '12 at 8:07

Oct
6
comment Is there a cognitive psychology theory for social curiosity?
> I find nothing so special in being interested what your friend's friends are doing. @volkerjaan This is not the same situation. Pardon me if I'm not being clear because I am not active in this field. Here's an example - Consider a situation where volkjeraan and mcenley are friends. Now, there are x, y and z who are mutual friends of volkerjaan and mcenley. One day volkerjaan gets a message saying 3 of your mutual friends with mcenley - x,y and z - are interacting with mcenley. Now volkerjaan looks at this message and says "Hey, there's something happening here". What is this called?
Oct
4
comment Is there a cognitive psychology theory for social curiosity?
@volkerjaan Well I am unable to understand those cases but let me put it this way - lets say you and I are connected on cogsci stackexchange but do not interact. I receive a notification in my inbox which says "You know what 10 of your friends who are also friends with Volkerjaan" i.e. mutual friends are speaking to Vokerjaan. This results in an increase in curiosity and I say to myself "what is so special going on with Volkerjaan that so many of my friends are interacting. I better check him out now." It is only but natural to have such curiosity. I hope this helps!
Oct
4
comment Is there a cognitive psychology theory for social curiosity?
@JeromyAnglim Thanks for the response. Well, I am trying to find out if there exists a theory to explain what evokes curiosity. Lets say - I have not interacted with you on Facebook for a particular length of time for various reasons. However, my interest may arise when I notice a message on my timeline which says "5 of your friends are sending messages to Jeromy". It increases my curiosity level as a person as Jeromy's and my mutual friends are interacting and I want to be part of this little secret. Am I more clear now?