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40

Yes, writing increases the modality and attention given to a piece of information. Increasing the effort and the ways that you have experienced a bit of information helps you encode that information better; this is Elaborative Encoding. More generally the more deeply you process a thing the more likely you are to properly encode the memory for future ...


20

I'm going to disagree with Ben here. My colleague Adam Putnam has spent several years researching whether it's best for memory to speak, write, or even think particular responses out loud. His research has continued to turn up no differences between these different modalities, despite what we know about transfer-appropriate processing and elaborative ...


9

A recent senior thesis by Schoen (2012) addressed this exact question. Students watched a filmed lecture and were randomly assigned to take notes with either by typing or handwriting. After the lecture, students were given a few distractor tasks, and then given a retention test. Other students were assigned to take notes from a textbook, instead of a ...


5

Free association is an integral part of depth psychological therapy (such as psychoanalysis), which is still prevalent around the world (e.g. in Germany depth psychological therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy are the only two therapies paid for by health insurance). The problem with writing would be that it slows down the interactive process between ...


5

Leonardo da Vinci wrote both upside down, and in a mirror image. He did the latter partly to make it harder for others to read his journals and copy his ideas (he was doing his research in a time when it was forbidden by the church), but also to avoid smudging his writing. He was also left-handed. Here is someone who also writes upside down and backwards. ...


3

When lefties write left to right they face three difficulties: They risk smudging what they have already written The natural way to hold a pen means it is likely to dig in to the paper, rather than be drawn across it. They tend to slope the letters backwards. I don't really understand why, but righties can demonstrate this for themselves by writing lefty ...


3

The behavioral output itself can only indirectly affect memory, but the mechanism of reinforcement lies in its reception of attention. For instance, athletes who practice a sport seriously know, as also popularly attested by Mack and Cassteven's Mind Gym, that 50% of practice should be mental. They should watch the sport, imagine playing the sport, think ...


3

This phenomena is much more common than most people realize. I have been working with several elementary students over the last three years who could not read and write conventionally, but can do so easily when the book/paper is upside down. My wife and I also recently conducted an interview with a 74 year old retired reading teacher who discloses that ...


2

We have been studying behavioral and neural mechanisms of upside-down writing and reading in a case of a young left-handed women who writes and draws upside-down only. Apart from some interesting spatial processing results (superior in some tasks) we have no explanation so far. We did discover, however, that this phenomenon is much more common than hitherto ...


2

I can't think of any information relating directly to distiction of letters in the english Alphabet, so instead I pulled out some stuff on our corrolations between shapes and long/short term memory: Abstract In four experiments, we examined the effect of pairing colors with either homogeneous or heterogeneous shapes on a short-term memory task. In ...



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