Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

i havent read this, but a search for "retina plasticity" brings up this, which should answer your question. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123708809004072 I used the search term "plasticity" because that refers to the ability of the nervous system to change itself, of which learning is a subset.


4

Your question is about the hard problem of consciousness, which is basically the question of how qualia can be explained in a mechanistic way. As alluded to by the name of the problem, it's hard to give a satisfactory answer. The answer right now is: we don't know. There are some theories about how qualia and consciousness could have a neural basis (see ...


3

A human brain recognises letters by their constituent features (sub-letter parts). It is modelized by a pandemonium model where printed information is extracted locally then globally. In the letter recognition literature, this type of feature-based hierarchical model competes with template matching theories (with an advantage to the pandemonium-like models ...


2

This is an interesting methodological problem. On the one hand, it seems that any method which would present the halves to the correct eye, and only that eye, would entail a visible boundary, and any method with an invisible boundary would be unable to present the halves as desired. Virtual reality systems present stimuli to each eye separately (e.g., the ...


-1

The cumulative number of versions of a single character that the human brain can recognize is nearly infinite, whereas computers have to be programmed to recognize every single variation. Humans also recognize 'context' in a word, whereas a computer does not recognize context because it does not have an intuitive understanding of language. From wikipedia: ...


7

The human visual processing system receives input from the eyes, and then passes it through a number of areas of the brain that break it down, process it in various different ways, recombine it, and break it down again several times. I'm assuming this question is only about the visual cortex, general theories about how information might be broken down for ...


5

A 2006 study by Horrey, Wickens and Consalus implemented a computational SEEV (Salience, Effort, Effort, Value) model for driving behavior that predicted scanning behavior, which I surmise is what was meant. The authors conclude: The most important practical implication of the current results is that a simple expected value version of the SEEV model ...



Top 50 recent answers are included