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I've recently became aware of the field of Evolutionary Psychology and read the book "Why beautiful people have more daughters" by Satoshi Kanazawa. It is quite enlightening - this new field suggests that humans have built-in psychological programs and preferences. Kanazawa suggests - when looking for a potential mate in the african savanna, without the ...


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For a review of this question is debated in Cognitive Science, search for Searle's Chinese Room Thought Experiment. In the Chinese Room Thought Experiment, Searle argues that there is something fundamentally meaningful (semantic-holding-preserving) about the internal state of a living being. Additionally, this meaning cannot be approximated by a computer. ...


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Forgive me for not including any references (I've been out of the human movement science for a while) , but it is believed that movements are saved and executed in a "goal-directed" way. It is not the case that every muscle has its own area and they are individually activated on a scale of 0 (no contraction) -100 (max contraction) depending on the movement ...


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There are many transformations between the light hitting your retina and your perception of the world. The signals from your retina initially travel through the visual pathways to reach your visual cortex, where visual information is processed. The representation of this visual information in your brain is also shaped by other brain activity representing ...


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It is not the case that the brain flips the retinal image, nor does it have to, nor are there any images in the brain like there are on the retina. It is just as meaningless to say that the retinal image is upside down in relation to the orientation of our perceptions. Richard L. Gregory gives a nice explanation: It is generally accepted that this does ...


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This isn't exactly what you are referring to, but I think provides a similar function and has been shown in vertebrate vision: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normalization_model Divisive normalization as a canonical computation across the brain While this does not implement histogram equalization, I think it is actually a better-suited explanation of the ...


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I don't exactly what it is you want, but if you are looking for other analyzing techniques, you should try Independent Component Analysis. I have heard (but I do not have references) that ICA is better than PCA analyses. A very neat (and free) Matlab toolbox that has this function is FieldTrip (http://www.fieldtriptoolbox.org/). It is a nicely documented ...


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I think the key concept to tackle this question is to consider the concept of abstraction. Abstract models are generalized models of some kind "reality" that we are interested in, with the aim to describe some behavior of the system in question reasonably well. Often the abstraction should also be relevant to many instances of the entity that we would like ...


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The final two paragraphs of that piece address this exact question. Although understanding how neurons communicate with each other contributes to our understanding of behaviour at the level of biology, behaviour cannot be reduced to biological explanations. In conclusion, the communication of neurons within the nervous system assists our ...



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