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Title question: See below Question 1: Sort of. Question 2: Yes. Question 3: Yes. The wrinkly outer layer of the human brain, the neocortex, is an anatomical feature found only in mammals. It is largely responsible for our ability to process sensory information in great detail, and plays a large role in memory formation, recognition, and higher thought. ...


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I'm not sure the math checks out in the question (the CPU cycles per second seems awfully high), but I think there are some useful principles to keep in mind regardless of the details of the math. So let's assume that we do have a computer that can perform more operations per second than the combined sum of all action potentials in the brain per second. Is ...


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Have you ever seen IBM's Watson? Watson is composed of a cluster of ninety IBM Power 750 servers, each of which uses a 3.5 GHz POWER7 eight core processor, with four threads per core. In total, the system has 2,880 POWER7 processor cores and has 16 terabytes of RAM. It must be kept in a (very) large refrigerated room. Watson is a question answering (QA) ...


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I will just show the statistics of last attempt to mimic the brain process. Last year Japan launched there fastest supercomputer: K computer OR SPARC64 VIIIfx 2.0GHz Features: Manufacturer: Fujitsu Cores: 705,024 Linpack Performance (Rmax) 10,510 TFlop/s Theoretical Peak (Rpeak) 11,280.4 TFlop/s Power: 12,659.89 kW Memory: 1,410,048 GB ...


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The following book may help you: Wermter, S., Palm, G., & Elshaw, M. (Eds.). (2005). Biomimetic neural learning for intelligent robots: Intelligent systems, cognitive robotics, and neuroscience (Vol. 3575). Springer. LINK It is about neurology and robotics. One should have a strong background in many subjects. Search Google with the following phrase ...


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According to the paper, the advantage of this new approach over conventional ANNs, Deep Belief Networks (DBN) and Self-Organising Networks (SON) are: Remains functional during online learning. Requires only two layers connected with simultaneous supervised and unsupervised learning Employs spiking neuron models to reproduce central features ...


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"Perceptronium" - A quantum theory of consciousness Quote from the abstract (Consciousness as a State of Matter, Max Tegmark at MIT): We examine the hypothesis that consciousness can be understood as a state of matter, "perceptronium", with distinctive information processing abilities. We explore five basic principles that may distinguish ...


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Hofstadter provides a detailed set of criteria in Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies. Some of his criteria that I do not see mentioned above concern the flow of information-processing: whether or not the model evaluated flows through possibility space in a psychologically plausible way, and how to measure that. He also mentions, metaphorically, the ...


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If you have a physics background, you may be particularly interested in Sparse Distributed Memory, a model that provides a number of psychologically plausible characteristics, and is also neuroscientifically plausible. The model and some of its characteristics are summarized in this paper. Many great references have been provided by Nick Stauner (and I ...


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From the comments: I'm going to hazard a guess that these are neurons that are tuned to a particular direction in space and that the x-axis is the angle in multiples of π radians, particularly since these are related to the work of Georgopoulos and colleagues. Since we know these are positionally tuned neurons, you can see some other examples in this ...


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Memory is a big word. Usually, neuroscientists and psychologists will try to model a specific cognitive process: for example, long-term recognition memory (the ability to distinguish between previously learned items and new items). Here is a link to a very good introductory text in computational neuroscience (which includes a section about memory and ...


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As you have already hinted at, the issue is controversial. I could leave it at that and say "no, there is no consensus", and it would be a true answer, but it wouldn't be satisfying, wouldn't it? Instead, I'll briefly define the topic, give a few examples, and then a few recent criticisms. My answer will be weighted somewhat towards "cognition" instead of ...



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