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2

Yes, knowing they are under an Iowa (or Wisconsin) test will change their behavior---and most likely create all sorts of biases in the results. And you're probably right; time constraints will most likely place subjects into system1 thinking. Subjects' having knowledge about an experiment may generally ruin it, for it can make testability collapse (how ...


2

Tough question. I'm going to assume that the question pertains to measures which lack all the information you've outlined: test manual, validity studies, website and key articles, item content and normative comparisons. If these assumptions are correct, then what you are a describing is an insufficiently explained measure. I will argue that we necessarily ...


3

'Precision' in classical test theory Most accounts of classical test theory do not have a notion of precision as such, but occasionally, reliability may be called precision instead. The relationship is probably most concisely illustrated with the standard dartboards. This is also explained on the Wikipedia Item Response Theory page, but as you can see, in ...


0

Why would you do an aptitude test? What does it predict? An aptitude test shows only how well a person performs in whatever that test tests at that specific moment in his or her life. It completely disregards the possibility that the person might have aptitudes that a certain test ignores. And while the theory holds that personality or intelligence are ...


6

Because it has been a few years since Jeromy's original answer, and because I just read a very apt article, I will venture an update on the state of the field with respect to the BPI's validity. Overall, despite more research into brain training and Lumosity, there is little to no peer-reviewed evidence supporting the Lumosity BPI's validity, nor evidence ...


3

Yes, they do, but not all of these are different methods for testing memory. Because of the way you've set up the stimulus presentation here, these are effectively all serial verbal working memory tests where the neurocognitive basis may differ or not depending on a number of unstated factors such as stimulus modality or type (e.g., Polyn et al., 2005), ...



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