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6

There are many definitions of intelligence. I find the one given by David Wechsler (1944) useful in the context of this question: The ... capacity of the individual ... to deal effectively with his environment Finding a solution quickly is sometimes necessary if you want to deal with your environment effectively. Not all problems will wait for you to ...


3

This question may be too complex to answer specifically as there are several components that identify Logical-Mathematical intelligence. In terms of behaviour high LMI people need things to explore and think about, and are often seen as manipulative and often seek new experiences or topic matter to discover. These people love to experiment, question, ...


2

To measure the frequencies of different patterns (do some patterns occur more frequently that others based on group) I see this as a chi-squared test of independence. If you are unfamiliar with the test, a quick example is here. For your situation, all participants would get the same placements of dots, and you would count how often each possible pattern is ...


2

This seems difficult for a number of reasons. First, are you interested in testing the retrieval of pre-existing semantic memories or the ability to form new semantic memories? It is entirely possible that exposure to nature increases one without the other, so be sure you're testing the one you're interested in (or both, carefully). Second, semantic ...


2

Yes, knowing they are under an Iowa (or Wisconsin) test will change their behavior---and most likely create all sorts of biases in the results. And you're probably right; time constraints will most likely place subjects into system1 thinking. Subjects' having knowledge about an experiment may generally ruin it, for it can make testability collapse (how ...


2

Tough question. I'm going to assume that the question pertains to measures which lack all the information you've outlined: test manual, validity studies, website and key articles, item content and normative comparisons. If these assumptions are correct, then what you are a describing is an insufficiently explained measure. I will argue that we necessarily ...


2

Why would I be asked to count backwards by 3, from 100 in a psychological test? This is to test your cognitive reasoning abilities, particularly your ability to concentrate and recall serial information. Similar tests are administered to injured sports players to ensure that they do not have a concussion. 1 What's a baker's dozen? What do you think ...


2

We have developed an iPad cognitive test battery (CABPad) for use at bedside with stroke patients: www.cognisoft.info. It is used for research at two university hospitals in Copenhagen and a publication on validation is currently being prepared for publication (see this abstract from The International Stroke Conference, Feb 2015: L Willer, PM Pedersen, A ...


1

This idea of score is interesting, but it's painful to assess if the two problems you raised are important or not. For the re-use of the "meaure group" I think it would be careful to not do it. I took much thinking over it and I still don't know what to think. Unfortunately, I have no solution, but if I share my different thoughts process here maybe it would ...


1

An otherwise 'brilliant' person can be slow at solving certain problems, yes. And no, cognitive performance is not the same thing as running a marathon. A marathon measures your ability to reach a certain point in a certain amount of time. An intelligence test (or any academic test, for that matter) assesses to make sure that you have learned the material ...



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