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8

Firmin et al. (2008) tested the validity of a handful of online IQ tests by having college students complete IQ tests at three different websites and also complete a validated lab measure, the Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS). They found that there were moderate correlations ($r$ values were around 0.4 to 0.5) between some of the online tests ...


7

Because it has been a few years since Jeromy's original answer, and because I just read a very apt article, I will venture an update on the state of the field with respect to the BPI's validity. Overall, despite more research into brain training and Lumosity, there is little to no peer-reviewed evidence supporting the Lumosity BPI's validity, nor evidence ...


6

Yes, they are still in use, and they provide rather bad information. My former advisor once worked with a clinician who told him that the main reason they're any better than using the weather report as a projective stimulus is that the Rorschach tests have been in use as-is for decades. Hence we have a better understanding of how people normally react to ...


3

'Precision' in classical test theory Most accounts of classical test theory do not have a notion of precision as such, but occasionally, reliability may be called precision instead. The relationship is probably most concisely illustrated with the standard dartboards. This is also explained on the Wikipedia Item Response Theory page, but as you can see, in ...


3

Yes, they do, but not all of these are different methods for testing memory. Because of the way you've set up the stimulus presentation here, these are effectively all serial verbal working memory tests where the neurocognitive basis may differ or not depending on a number of unstated factors such as stimulus modality or type (e.g., Polyn et al., 2005), ...


3

People use a wide range of language to describe measurement points in repeated measures design. For example if you measured some dependent variable on multiple occasions you might have something like: baseline (B) treatment week 1 (T1) treatment week 2 (T2) post treatment (F0) six month follow up (F6) one year follow (F12) Obviously such a design has ...


3

There are many definitions of intelligence. I find the one given by David Wechsler useful in the context of this question: The ... capacity of the individual ... to deal effectively with his environment Finding a solution quickly is sometimes necessary if you want to deal with your environment effectively. Not all problems will wait for you to solve ...


2

To measure the frequencies of different patterns (do some patterns occur more frequently that others based on group) I see this as a chi-squared test of independence. If you are unfamiliar with the test, a quick example is here. For your situation, all participants would get the same placements of dots, and you would count how often each possible pattern is ...


2

This seems difficult for a number of reasons. First, are you interested in testing the retrieval of pre-existing semantic memories or the ability to form new semantic memories? It is entirely possible that exposure to nature increases one without the other, so be sure you're testing the one you're interested in (or both, carefully). Second, semantic ...


2

Yes, knowing they are under an Iowa (or Wisconsin) test will change their behavior---and most likely create all sorts of biases in the results. And you're probably right; time constraints will most likely place subjects into system1 thinking. Subjects' having knowledge about an experiment may generally ruin it, for it can make testability collapse (how ...


2

A few thoughts: MBTI has four dimensions, whereas the Big Five has five dimensions. Thus, when you set a high-low split on MBTI you get $2^4=16$ types. If you were to apply the same idea to the Big 5, you could get $2^5=32$. However, the Big 5 framework tends to take the underlying continuum of personality traits more seriously. At the very least this ...


2

There is a program called Paradigm that allows you to build millisecond-accurate neurocognitive experiments for iOS devices. The experiment builder is like E-Prime but easier to use. The app is available in the app store. You upload your experiments to a Dropbox and then log in to access them through the app. It's pretty flexible. I've used it to build ...


2

NEO FFI Scoring The test manual describes how to calculate raw scores for the NEO-FFI. If you have been asked to do an analysis of the NEO-FFI then you should be given access to relevant details in the test manual. If you don't have access, you may wish to contact your local psychology department. They will often have a test library with the NEO-FFI manual. ...


2

N.B.: There are many varieties of "Stroop-like" tasks, which as a class are often called implicit association tests or IATs. Since those are likely to test attributes related to their specific construction, I have excluded them from this answer. There have been a variety of papers studying correlations of Stroop performance with other characteristics. ...


2

The Open Extended Jungian Type Scales is a open source alternative to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. The Open Extended Jungian Type Scales was developed to be an open source alternative to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. The OEJTS was developed by empirically selecting items that differentiated among persons who identified as one of the Myers-Briggs ...


2

Tough question. I'm going to assume that the question pertains to measures which lack all the information you've outlined: test manual, validity studies, website and key articles, item content and normative comparisons. If these assumptions are correct, then what you are a describing is an insufficiently explained measure. I will argue that we necessarily ...


2

To add to the existing answers (of which @what's gets special mention), an issue I don't think has really been addressed is the statistical reason for it being so difficult to measure extremely high IQs. By design, IQ is scaled so that it's normally distributed, with a mean of 100, and a standard deviation (SD) of 15. A well known feature of the normal ...


2

Obtaining the quartiles: Typically you obtain quartiles from the data. Thus, you would have sample data (either your dataset or another dataset), and you can use software to give you .25 and .75 percentiles (or alternatively, you can get such values fairly straightforwardly by rank ordering the data). Of course, you might be referring to a slightly ...


1

The Stroop test also correlates with age and education level (Van der Elst et al. 2006). When emotionally charged words are presented (Emo-Stroop), the Stroop task was found to correalte with high state anxiety.(Dresler et al 2009) You can find a review in "Secondary Influences on Neuropsychological Test Performance", edited by Peter Arnett. (Its on google ...


1

The state of the art in computer-scored Thematic Apperception Tests (TAT) as of 2015 appears to be that computer-scored TATs do not exist. There does not appear to be any relevant results on Google Scholar, Web of Science or Scopus for any search I can think of including the term "thematic apperception" which yield any example or mention of computer-scored ...


1

In most cases, increasing the number of items on a personality test will increase the reliability of measurement (see the Spearman-Brown formula). Thus, there is a trade-off between test length and reliability. There are several 10 item measures of the Big 5. Notably, the TIPI and BFI-10 (Rammstedt et al, 2007). However, I would strongly discourage anyone ...


1

This idea of score is interesting, but it's painful to assess if the two problems you raised are important or not. For the re-use of the "meaure group" I think it would be careful to not do it. I took much thinking over it and I still don't know what to think. Unfortunately, I have no solution, but if I share my different thoughts process here maybe it would ...


1

Depending on the instructions that you give to the person, you might be able to disguise the fact that they are completing a color-blindness test. You could use stimuli like those in the Ishihara test, but instead ask the subject to do a math problem where they add the previous two numbers. You can also tell them that sometimes no number will be presented, ...


1

Your question is pretty broad at the moment. But a few starting points: The PANAS is a commonly used measure of mood or well-being that asks respondents to rate how frequently they have experienced a set of positive and negative emotions. Many broad-based personality measures such as those based on the Big 5 will have have factors or facets that relate ...



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