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You are correct in that these terms are very close in definition, but terminology is not just about identifying a concept. Terminology is also about identifying the perspective from which you will look at the concept and the community to which you, as the researcher, belong. Here, free-riding and social loafing have very different histories. Social loafing ...


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You are asking about rating scales and specifically to the difference between numbering opposed to larger-than / smaller-than ratings. You have to realize that when subjects rate on a scale from, e.g., 0 to 10, the S is already quite explicitly indicating whether a trial's stimulus is larger or smaller than a previous trial. Even if you force an absolute ...


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A receptive field is often functionally characterized by electrophysiological experiments. During these experiments, a certain area of the body is stimulated (e.g., a certain part of the visual field is illuminated, or a certain area o the skin is haptically stimulated, etc.). Then it is determined if a neuron shows a response, either a stimulation ...


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ad 1. Difficult to answer, but I found an article from as early as 1825 that links the rotating spokes illusion to the retina (Roget, 1825). ad 2. Interesting question, but more a question of semantics I think. Personally, I think optical illusion is fine, as used by a master of illusions Michael Bach. Admittedly, he is German, so if this is linguistically ...


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There is no specific term for this entire phenomenon because there is more than one psychological theory playing a role in your overindulgence or "binge". Fatigue from repetitiveness, durability bias, and habituation all play a huge role in determining how long you can listen to a certain song before its gets repetitive and boring. On the other hand, ...



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