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This term depicts a wide spread problem in society that the term 'mental illness' carries with it stigmas and negative connotations. Firstly, From a psychologist's perspective, we want people with mental illnesses to recognise them and seek help/treatment so that the problem can be solved. However, negative labels often cause people to ignore signs of ...


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The relevant section 8.03 in the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct does not employ a proper term. In the literature, »deception/deceptive study/experiment/method(s)« are sometimes used, however not in the sense of a technical term – most often the matter is paraphrased as in »studies that use deception«. The Milgram experiment(s) ...


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If "brain waves" produce a time-varying electric potential as shown on the EEG, then as far as I know electromagnetic waves are present. I was taught that you cannot have a time varying electric potential without creating an electromagnetic wave. You can try browsing wiki explanation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations, but the main idea is ...


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Short answer Brainwaves are typically associated with the electroencephalogram, which is a signal mainly composed of potential differences generated in the superficial layers of the brain. Potential differences represent electric fields and do not represent electromagnetic (EM) radiation. EM radiation is build up of packets of energy (photons). EM radiation ...


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Short answer Brain waves are not electromagnetic waves. Long answer Measured brain activity, as you already mentioned, is the result of individual neurons firing. The activity exists, in fact, of two parts. First of all, there are the action potentials (APs). APs are current flow within a neuron from one end to the other. The magnitude of these APs (and ...


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I agree with Christiaan. Similar movements are stored nearby and are thus difficult to distinguish (see How are movements stored in the brain? ), even more so with the spatial resolution of EEG. What I would like to add is that for imagery to be motor imagery, you have to imagine the movement in first person perspective. Imaging someone else to execute a ...


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As far as I know, brain-computer interfaces based on EEG use motor-cortex responses by asking the subject to imagine body movements. E.g., a left-arm movement imagination would translate to moving the robot to the left etc. In other words, imagining the robot going left will probably result in a diffuse, poor-defined brain response, while imagined motor ...



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