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15

"Science" refers to a methodology for obtaining knowledge, and often to the knowledge itself as well. Science is often confused with another term "technology", that refers to the application of such knowledge for practical uses. Some people might incorrectly refer to "computers" and "cars" as examples of "science", when in fact they are examples of "...


9

Interesting question! Theory of mind is the ability to attribute mental states, motivations, etc. to others and recognize that others have separate intentions, states, and motivations from his or her own. The specific phenomenon that you are describing may stem from this concept called naive realism, or the idea that we see the world as it truly is, and ...


6

I found that dF/F0 stands for the relative difference in fluorescence at a certain wavelength.


5

It seems to depend on the reason for denying their illness... Egosyntonic: ... a term referring to behaviors, values, feelings that are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs and goals of the ego, or consistent with one's ideal self-image. ... Many personality disorders are considered to be egosyntonic ... Anorexia ... is also considered ...


5

I think the examples refer to a variety of possible terms. In cognitive science, there is much interest in cases where justification is triggered unconsciously. The general tendency to justify one's decisions - especially the bad ones - is called self-justification: Self-justification describes how, when a person encounters cognitive dissonance, or a ...


5

Self-selection bias is probably the best domain specific term. Generally, this is called assortativity, as in assortative mating.


5

There is no specific term for this entire phenomenon because there is more than one psychological theory playing a role in your overindulgence or "binge". Fatigue from repetitiveness, durability bias, and habituation all play a huge role in determining how long you can listen to a certain song before its gets repetitive and boring. On the other hand, ...


5

You are correct in that these terms are very close in definition, but terminology is not just about identifying a concept. Terminology is also about identifying the perspective from which you will look at the concept and the community to which you, as the researcher, belong. Here, free-riding and social loafing have very different histories. Social loafing ...


5

The relevant section 8.03 in the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct does not employ a proper term. In the literature, »deception/deceptive study/experiment/method(s)« are sometimes used, however not in the sense of a technical term – most often the matter is paraphrased as in »studies that use deception«. The Milgram experiment(s) ...


4

Short answer Brain waves are not electromagnetic waves. Long answer Measured brain activity, as you already mentioned, is the result of individual neurons firing. The activity exists, in fact, of two parts. First of all, there are the action potentials (APs). APs are current flow within a neuron from one end to the other. The magnitude of these APs (and ...


4

Short answer Brainwaves are typically associated with the electroencephalogram, which is a signal mainly composed of potential differences generated in the superficial layers of the brain. Potential differences represent electric fields and do not represent electromagnetic (EM) radiation. EM radiation is build up of packets of energy (photons). EM radiation ...


3

There are two ways to interpret/answer this question. First, is there a recognized disorder that is characterized by mania in the absence of depression? Second, are there people who experience mania in the absence of depression? The answer to the first interpretation is no. There is currently no "major manic disorder" or "unipolar mania." Given the DSM-5 ...


3

They are interchangeable. ADD was a term used until around the mid 80s and ADHD aftewards. In the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 1980 (DSM-III) published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) it was named ADD and the name changed to ADHD in the 1987 edition, DSM-III-R (which I can find no online sources of). ADD has been ...


3

So far, I've found that the American Psychiatric Association's DSM 5 has made it abundantly clear they no longer consider gender variance itself a disorder, to the point of a 2012 position statement on access to care, a 2012 "Position Statement on Discrimination Against Transgender and Gender Variant Individuals", and updated language in the DSM. It also ...


3

As an Industrial/Organizational Psychologist practicing Human Factors in a large organization, I use scientific method to inform product and service design. Our dependent variables (effectiveness, efficiency, satisfaction, enjoyment, coolness) are measured across controlled experimental conditions. We practice stronger science than most physical scientists ...


2

Based on Josh' answer, I eventually ended up with 'delay gratification' and planning to use the Delay Gratification Inventory to measure this in participants. Hoerger M, Quirk SW, Weed NC. Development and validation of the Delaying Gratification Inventory. Psychological assessment. 2011;23(3):725-738. doi:10.1037/a0023286.


2

when it comes to psychology it feels to me a bit like astrology, where there are some things that can work, but mostly because of auto-suggestion, or any other kind of suggestions, and things like the placebo (or even the nocebo) effect. So, I wonder if psychology is a science and why so many people rely on it. A key point is that your question seems to be ...


2

Short answer "Perceptual competence" is "the ability to perceive". Background I Googled "perceptual competence" and the first hit was an open source article (Lencz et al., 2003). They define perceptual competence as: [The] initial representation of to-be-remembered material [in the context of working memory]. Perceptual competency itself can include ...


2

ad 1. Difficult to answer, but I found an article from as early as 1825 that links the rotating spokes illusion to the retina (Roget, 1825). ad 2. Interesting question, but more a question of semantics I think. Personally, I think optical illusion is fine, as used by a master of illusions Michael Bach. Admittedly, he is German, so if this is linguistically ...


2

The dictionary definition of "unconscious" is to not be capable of conscious thought, ie, be asleep and unaware. Technically, you are unconscious when you are asleep. When you get knocked out ie. a concussion, it is thought that the forces from the injury disrupt the normal cellular activities in the reticular activating system located in the areas ...


2

If "brain waves" produce a time-varying electric potential as shown on the EEG, then as far as I know electromagnetic waves are present. I was taught that you cannot have a time varying electric potential without creating an electromagnetic wave. You can try browsing wiki explanation https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s_equations, but the main idea is ...


1

This may not fit exactly the scenario described, but some form of strategic affect display or 'appraisal theory', these relate to social theories of (& displays of) emotion, as oppose personality traits as such, but may be relevant nonetheless. So for example, you might want to come across as being more aggressive & assertive, or alternately more ...


1

Maybe (from wiki) Loopholes A loophole is an ambiguity or inadequacy in a system, such as a law or security, which can be used to circumvent or otherwise avoid the intent, implied or explicitly stated, of the system. Loopholes are searched for and used strategically in a variety of circumstances, including taxes, elections, politics, the criminal justice ...



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