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There are some informative examples in Baayen, Davidson and Bates (2008), though some of their advice is outdated, having been supplanted by Barr et al. (2013) cited in the answer above. I found it useful to read these two papers together, though. I'd like to add my voice to @Christian in stressing that one common gap in reporting such models is which ...


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The APA style manual does not provide specific guidelines for linear mixed models. Additionally, a review of studies using linear mixed models reported that the psychological papers surveyed differed 'substantially' in how they reported on these models (Barr, Levy, Scheepers and Tily, 2013). It depends greatly on your study, in other words. Normatively ...


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I am particularly concerned with whether or not the task load index could be considered an interval variable, Yup. This is a fundamental assumption people make when constructing, administering and analyzing any measure under the classical test theory (CTT) paradigm i.e. count items and add 'em up. That is to say, your variable is certainly treated ...


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In Stevens' levels of measurement framework, the NASA-TLX is an ordinal scale, not an interval scale, because there is no way to know a priori how much "workload" each point corresponds to. In other words, we can only know how much workload a point corresponds to after observing the data from our sample. Indeed, Hart's own review of the NASA-TLX suggests ...


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'Precision' in classical test theory Most accounts of classical test theory do not have a notion of precision as such, but occasionally, reliability may be called precision instead. The relationship is probably most concisely illustrated with the standard dartboards. This is also explained on the Wikipedia Item Response Theory page, but as you can see, in ...


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It is difficult to overstate the extent to which analysis of variance-based linear modeling based for different groups dominates the cognitive sciences. A recent methodological review of the psychology literature suggesting that these analyses are used to test hypotheses in as much as 95% of studies (citation pending me recovering it). There are alternatives ...



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