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In reference to your question, A diagnosis Is not something that should be generally thrown out if someone has a mild obsession for school. If you were to go into the DSM-V and look for an actual diagnosis because the obsession seems unreasonable and interacts with daily functioning, three diagnosis would come to mind. A spectrum disorder, such as Autism ...


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To my knowledge there are no such diagnosable disorders. Remember, disorders are only disorders when they significantly and negatively impact social and/or occupational functioning. So if a person only talks about special interests, this might impact social functioning but how significant is it? Does the participant have friends which support his interests? ...


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The definition of aggression and violence is a thorny issue, and there is considerable disagreement about the terms between disciplines, but also within disciplines. Sometimes authors use the terms interchangeably. In psychology, the term aggression is often used as the broader term that encompasses all forms of harmful behavior. For example, according to ...


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A good primer on the psychological effects of mimicry is the review by Chartrand and Lakin (2013), who define mimicry as "the automatic imitation of gestures, postures, mannerisms, and other motor movements" (also see this earlier question). They cite several findings suggesting that mimicry indeed contributes to positive relationships between people. For ...


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I think the most commonly used term for this is the curse of knowledge. On p1233 of Camerer et al (1989) it's defined as the phenomenon whereby "In predicting the judgments of others, agents are unable to ignore the additional information they possess." This seems to be the first time this term was used in print, although the authors state that the ...


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Young children often learn how to lie before they have truly developed a sense for what it is, or why it may be unethical. This is demonstrated by the propensity for children to tell exaggerated and implausible lies, as young children may not yet have a sense of social cognition (or 'theory of mind'), and thus do not yet understand what others may find ...


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The kind of involuntary, imitative behavior you are describing is usually called behavioral mimicry - "the automatic imitation of gestures, postures, mannerisms, and other motor movements" (Chartrand & Lakin, 2013). Chartrand and Lakin's (2013) review is a good starting point into the research that has been done on this phenomenon. They provide ...


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Research has shown that introverts tend to be more sensitive to stimulus. So, in a highly stimulating environment, the introvert is much more likely to be overwhelmed than the extrovert. In this situation, the introvert is likely to be more emotionally stressed than the extrovert. The situation is reversed in a low stimulation environment. The extrovert ...


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Neuroticism is more strongly associated with emotional stressors in the form of depression and anxiety than is extraversion. That being said, extraversion is negatively correlated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and self-reported lifetime mental disorder, even after adjusting for gender, age, and education. It appears that depression is moderately ...


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Can asking a leading question in a poll change the opinion of the respondent? Yes, apparantly everyone is susceptible to leading questions. Conside rable attention has been devoted to suggestive questions and its effects. Experimental research by Elizabeth F. Loftus, an American psychologist and an expert on human memory, has established that ...


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When it comes to serious situations, one may react with feeling the events as surreal. One may have trouble believing that what is happening is actually real. What happens next is that one may be confused and dissociate with the event: In philosophy, "the Absurd" refers to the conflict between (1) the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning ...


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Interesting question. I have thought about this a lot, and while I cannot offer a conclusive answer, I can offer some ideas that stem from scientific literature. I should note that this question may technically be considered off-topic, as it seems to be looking for a diagnosis (and self-help questions are prohibited on this website). However, for the sake ...


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Summary (copied from last paragraph) It appears that extended exposure to cognitive dissonance ignites an initial emotional reaction that is then mediated by the rationalization process. If no rationalization can be made, or if the emotion cannot be effectively controlled by the individual, then the initial emotional reaction may grow more powerful, ...


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I found a study that says introverts and extroverts are about equally talkative in written form: "There is little empirical information about differences in computer-mediated communication related to personality. However, it has been widely speculated that introvertive personality traits are especially appropriate for CMC. The results of the present ...



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