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8

What you describe is an illusion. (a) The human field of view is almost 180° when staring straight ahead and 270° with eyeball rotation (looking to the side without turning your head). If you look at someone from slightly behind and to the side, they will appear to be gazing forward, and you may feel unnoticed, but in fact you are within their field of ...


6

Rather than discuss limits of the human field of view, or extrasensory perception (I don't know anything about the first, and the second is a myth), I think we can look at this as a simple case of illusory correlation (wikipedia), which is both a psychological phenomenon, and something psychologists need to overcome to investigate other phenomena. In a ...


6

Attraction Social psychology deals extensively with (sexual, erotic, friendly) human-to-human attraction. If you understand attraction, you know how to seduce. It is true that social psychology does not provide a manual for seduction, and in my opinion this may have two reasons. Social psychology is not an applied, but a basic science, interested in ...


4

I think what you are getting at is the concept of "stimulation". It has been shown in literature that individuals have varying "ideal" levels of stimulation and this can be measured using popular scales (Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale being one of them). The stimulation - performance relationship can be thought of an inverted U-shaped curve with a peak ...


3

Anthropologists have shown that all cultures have the same "amount" and "intensity" of modesty, shame and sexual excitability. What differs are clothing and behavioral habits, and therefore what is considered modest, what causes shame, and what causes sexual arousal. The most extensive meta-analytic study on this topic is Hans-Peter Duerr's five volume Der ...


3

This is a weird one! Looks like your professor's on to something. Holmes' (2010) New Scientist article, "Why men are attracted to women with small feet" gives an interesting intro based on Atkinson and Rowe (2010), which was a rather hard-to-track-down poster (not that I've retrieved the original). They produced facial composites of eight women each based on ...


2

You can probably classify non-fiction books written for a lay audience into three categories: Books written by experts and summarizing research in a non-technical language that can be understood by non-experts. The only difference between such a book and a research article is that this book simplifies the findings and cites its sources in a vague and ...


2

Sparring Mind lists an exhaustive list of the best cog sci books, focusing particularly on peer influence and persuasion. The books range from selp-help tips and tricks to more focused research on a particular aspect of social psychology. The best thing about some of the books listed here is that the anecdotes are not just interesting to read, but are also ...


2

The concept you are looking for is social conformity, which is opposed to personal autonomy. Scales measuring this concept, such as the Feldman conformity scale (Feldman, 2003) and the conformity subscale of the "Portraits Value Questionnaire" (Schwartz et al., 2001), contain items similar to your examples, e.g. Obeying the rules and fitting in are signs ...


2

Much of the scientific literature in psychology is concerned with proposing and empirically testing theories. However, if you are a practitioner you are interested in how you can apply these ideas to achieve applied goals. This requires that you understand the support for various scientific ideas and that you are able to apply them to a specific situation. ...


2

Assuming the specific case of being "motivated towards a career" rather then simply getting a job to make ends meet, there can be several factors. Social status is probably the most common pursuit of a career. Enjoyment, which is the ideal reason for pursuing a career. Usually a career sought for enjoyment is referred to as 'pursuing one's dream'. ...


2

To answer your general question, many psychology experiment delivery systems, and even general programming languages could be used to present a set of trials where participants provide responses regarding pairs of visual stimuli. In particular, I've found Inquisit to be a good option if you want to deliver the experiment online. If you examine the task ...


2

This sounds to me very much (but not exactly) like a phenomenon Dan Ariely has done some research on, which he terms 'the IKEA effect'. Of course, he will describe it better than me, specifically in Norton and Ariely (2012), Ariely et al (2008), and this TED talk. Basically, what he's found is that people value things (furniture, lego models, plans) more ...


1

I think the most obvious match to what you are talking about in terms of social psychology terminology is cognitive dissonance theory. This theory covers a lot of phenomena, but in relation to friendship an attitude formation, it suggests that we will tend to like what our friends like in order to achieve a state of belief consistency. From a more ...


1

This is often a common phenomenon, but the context that you cited in your question might hold the key to one possible explanation. When you are presenting your design to someone who is "supposed" to evaluate your design, finding flaws enforces the self-efficacy of the evaluator and signals to him that he's doing his job well. So, the boost to ...


1

It's a pretty huge question due to its generality, but at that level, it's probably safe to say most things can produce problems in excess. The only specific things you've mentioned are anxiety and perfectionism as far as I can tell. More specifics would help generate clearer answers, but @Prasanta's is good for anxiety, and your intuition resembles theory ...


1

I don't know of direct research on these exact beliefs, but since you've asked, I'll offer some indirect theoretical support for a positive correlation hypothesis. First, I'll reframe your belief constructs in terms of known and studied phenomena. 1) Everyone has to take care of himself; it's not mandatory for people to be nice and good, it's mandatory ...



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