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6

The kind of involuntary, imitative behavior you are describing is usually called behavioral mimicry - "the automatic imitation of gestures, postures, mannerisms, and other motor movements" (Chartrand & Lakin, 2013). Chartrand and Lakin's (2013) review is a good starting point into the research that has been done on this phenomenon. They provide ...


4

Can asking a leading question in a poll change the opinion of the respondent? Yes, apparantly everyone is susceptible to leading questions. Conside rable attention has been devoted to suggestive questions and its effects. Experimental research by Elizabeth F. Loftus, an American psychologist and an expert on human memory, has established that ...


3

Neuroticism is more strongly associated with emotional stressors in the form of depression and anxiety than is extraversion. That being said, extraversion is negatively correlated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and self-reported lifetime mental disorder, even after adjusting for gender, age, and education. It appears that depression is moderately ...


3

The word "Oikophobia" has several different definitions. In psychology, it usually means an aversion to home surroundings, or to objects in the home. However, the British philosopher Roger Scruton coined a new meaning, which is exactly what you are looking for: The disposition, in any conflict, to side with 'them' against 'us', and the felt need to ...


3

The definition of aggression and violence is a thorny issue, and there is considerable disagreement about the terms between disciplines, but also within disciplines. Sometimes authors use the terms interchangeably. In psychology, the term aggression is often used as the broader term that encompasses all forms of harmful behavior. For example, according to ...


2

A good primer on the psychological effects of mimicry is the review by Chartrand and Lakin (2013), who define mimicry as "the automatic imitation of gestures, postures, mannerisms, and other motor movements" (also see this earlier question). They cite several findings suggesting that mimicry indeed contributes to positive relationships between people. For ...


1

To my knowledge there are no such diagnosable disorders. Remember, disorders are only disorders when they significantly and negatively impact social and/or occupational functioning. So if a person only talks about special interests, this might impact social functioning but how significant is it? Does the participant have friends which support his interests? ...


1

I think the most commonly used term for this is the curse of knowledge. On p1233 of Camerer et al (1989) it's defined as the phenomenon whereby "In predicting the judgments of others, agents are unable to ignore the additional information they possess." This seems to be the first time this term was used in print, although the authors state that the ...


1

Interesting question. I have thought about this a lot, and while I cannot offer a conclusive answer, I can offer some ideas that stem from scientific literature. I should note that this question may technically be considered off-topic, as it seems to be looking for a diagnosis (and self-help questions are prohibited on this website). However, for the sake ...



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