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15

A general model of processing stimuli suggests that when information does not provide informational value, then we gradually begin to ignore it. Such a model is consistent with the experience of many people in relation to background traffic noise when moving from a quiet to a noisy neighbourhood. I.e., the frequency with which external traffic noise enters ...


11

Antonio, Nielsen and Doneri (1998) provide one assessment of self-reported prevalence of smell in dreams. To quote the abstract (my bolding): Although numerous studies have investigated the content of laboratory and home dream reports, surprisingly little is known about the prevalence of various sensory modes in dreams. 49 men and 115 women ...


10

Particulalry short wavelengths (such a UV light) have been shown to suppress melatonin[1], a hormone that regulates sleep. The authors also show that: All subjects had an elevated cortisol level in the 90 minutes prior to onset of light exposure compared with the corresponding clock time on the previous day So there's a kind daily memory in the ...


10

I am not aware of any study that specifically addresses dream recall, but there is a growing literature about "memory reconsolidation" or "post-reactivation plasticity", the idea that memory reactivation (recall) can temporarily return a memory to a state of high fragility and susceptibility to interference, after which a process similar to consolidation ...


9

Assuming there's not a neurological dysfunction underlying sleep deprivation (which is even more possible with Aspergers as sleep dysfunction is a typical comorbidity) it can simply be a learned behavior. The more you do something (whether you particularly "enjoy" it or not) the more likely you are to build it up as a habit. Procedural memory is always at ...


9

The scientific concept which most closely matches your description of "brain fog" is sleep inertia. Any theories on why this may happen? First, a brief detour. Sleep is divided up into 5 stages (stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and REM). Since 2007, NREM sleep has been reclassified into stages N1, N2, N3, with N3 being a combination of the former stages 3 and 4; ...


8

Not aware of any studies on this topic. I think this is a tricky question because of the nature of sleeping. Hypersomnia does not fit in with physiological nor psychological dependence because of the following (from the proposed DSM-V revision, but similar enough to the DSM-IV-TR) symptom: "The sleep periods are non-restorative (unrefreshing) or so ...


7

I will take a stab at this question, because lucid dreaming is somewhat of an area of expertise of mine. The first thing that you will notice as you explore the lucid dreaming is that the phenomenon is poorly recognized by modern sleep science. There are hundreds of articles that use scientific methods to study sleep disorders, like sleep apneas, restless ...


7

"Nor can I see potential for one to become psychologically dependent or addicted to sleep." I believe someone can become "psychologically dependent on sleep". I am 47 and have used sleep for 40 years to escape from life. I typically sleep 4-6 hours too much each day. I don't really physically need this sleep, since I then am often awake the next night ...


6

Measures of arousal surely do play a role in subject performance on a wide variety of cognitive tasks. Generally, scientists can safely ignore this factor as it is assumed to introduce random noise between participants. From a hypothesis testing perspective, scientists are much more worried about factors that introduce systematic bias, or factors that skew ...


6

It's obvious that people will move more when awake or doing exercise compared to being asleep or resting, however actigraphy provides a quantitative way to measure that. Therefore actigraphy is useful for studying sleep-wake cycles, activity-rest cycles and circadian rhythms. They have been shown to be reliable in determining when a subject is awake or ...


6

Disclaimer: As you have noted yourself, there aren't very many scientific researches on the topic. The only main points that I can derive are generally of blogs or sketchy speculations. As such, you are supposed to take this answer with a grain of salt. Interesting Thing of the Day notes that polyphasic sleep may make the person awake and alert but have ...


6

Theoretical perspective: No. I don't think so. From a cognitive information processing perspective, I would hypothesise that declarative learning of new facts would not occur while sleeping. Of course, learning declarative facts while awake, but in bed (e.g., when going to sleep or when waking up in the morning) is possible, and sleep is important in ...


6

Results from experiments with polyphasic sleep are (Stampi, 1992; as summarized in Pinel, Biopsychology): Test subjects needed two weeks or more to get used to a polyphasic sleep cycle. Once test subjects got used to their new sleeping pattern, they were happy with it and showed no deficits in performance tests. Leonardo da Vinci's rhythm of 15 minutes of ...


6

It has been theorized that it has to do with "visualizing" dreams, but the movements themselves are by virtue of the pattern of electrical activity as the waves travel between the Pons (in the brainstem), Geniculate nuclei (in the thalamus), and Occipital lobe. From PGO Waves PGO waves and REM sleep PGO waves are an integral part of rapid eye ...


6

One thing worth pointing out as a very terse hint of an answer: we all know that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is often referred to as the "fight-or-flight response," but parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activation is less commonly known as the "rest-and-digest" response...though this does appear on Wikipedia's PNS page. Eating (or maybe ...


6

Nocturnal lagophthalmos is the search term you're looking for. But it's less that they "can" fall asleep with their eyes open and more that they "can't" close their eyes during sleep: Nocturnal lagophthalmos is the inability to close the eyelids during sleep. Lagophthalmos is associated with exposure keratopathy, poor sleep, and persistent ...


6

I'm not completely sure, but you may be referring to Syncope, a medical term which describes events such as fainting or passing out which occurs upon low blood flow to the brain. As a result it can occur when under shock or trauma or a post-effect of stress. Obviously, one would expect the opposite to happen in half the events, such as after vomiting, ...


5

Here's why people need to sleep: The brain does its "cleaning up" during sleep. As cells in the nervous system are active, waste products are produced. In the rest of the body, waste removal is carried out by the lymphatic system, but this system does not extend to the brain. Instead, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) must be pumped through the brain tissue in ...


4

This study found that REM sleep "enhances the integration of unassociated information for creative problem solving", and to an extent that surpasses the benefits of "quiet rest and non-REM sleep". try a google scholar search for 'psychology sleep incubation '. Interestingly, the experiment that yielded the first discovery of a neurotransmitter was ...


4

Also, in Oliver Sack's The Man Who Mistook His For His Wife, the author and famous neurologist reports a case about a man who dreamed he had the olfactory powers of a dog; however, when he awoke, he still retained his heightened sense of smell and furthermore could prove it to the nurses. Any experience that one has in waking life can be recapitulated ...


4

Using activity monitors on awake patients is very domain specific. You need to equate them on some activity parameters and then look at how the individuals vary across some domain. For example, you could monitor athletes and correlate the amount of physical activity with performance. Or, you could monitor grade school children and look at something like ...


4

I've used the Zeo (http://www.myzeo.com/sleep/). It seems to work pretty well. It tracks which stage of sleep you are using a very basic EEG. There are some details on how it operates here: http://radar.oreilly.com/2009/10/how-the-zeo-sleep-device-works.html As I said, I've used it in the past and from what I can tell, it seems to be pretty accurate, ...



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