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10

Bottom line: No, Josh Pellicer's work is not based on science, not tested, nor peer-reviewed. However, I will qualify this statement slightly below. Many years ago, I listened to a few episodes of the The Tom Leykis Show, yet another highly sexist advice columnnist for men. Josh Pellicer is not the first, and certainly not the last, in a long line of ...


4

One meta-analysis of gender differences in cognitive abilities (verbal ability, quantitative ability, and visual–spatial ability): Results indicate that gender differences in all of these abilities were small: For verbal ability, the median ω–2 was .01 and the median d was .24; for quantitative ability, the median values of ω–2 and d were .01 and ...


3

One factor that should be considered is the culture surrounding casual sex and the social judgments that men and women may experience as a result of casual sex. Conley, Ziegler, and Moors (2012) report a series of experiments conducted on an American university campus that show that women who accept offers of casual sex are perceived more negatively on a ...


3

I think what happens is that researchers often don't report on - or at least don't highlight - uninteresting results, partly because of the difficulty getting uninteresting results published. So given that gender differences in IQ in general are eliminated for validity, a lack of gender differences in IQ amongst a seemingly arbitrary sub-population such as ...


2

Our social constructs play a big role in influencing how we respond. As with most common cognitive mechanisms - confluence of environmental triggers meet a biological predisposition. Regarding belief systems: in many traditions, femininity is guarded due to its relationship to motherhood. Women are thought not to be sexual. Masculinity is sexualized in a ...


1

To think that men and women would differ should be obvious (specialization to differing tasks). To think that one group would be better or worse overall would be counter-intuitive (survival would be worsened). When I was in college, the Engineering school with the highest proportion of women (46%) was Computer Science. I don't know why. I think it is also ...



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