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This is a really nice paper that tries to explain time-perception in a cognitive architecture called ACT-R. It is a model of human cognition that tries to explain human behavior with only basic functions (declarative and procedural memory, vision, working memory a.o.). Very shortly, the model is as following: There is a pacemaker. This pacemaker creates ...


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Short answer Sensations are different from thoughts and are separated in the spatial and temporal domain. The distinction between thoughts and perceptions, however, is less well defined, but can still be dealt with experimentally. Background A description of sensation is as follows: The physical process during which our sensory organs [...] respond to ...


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Short answer In practice, absolute pitch is generally tested for by using musical pitch classes. Background Absolute pitch (AP) is the ability to identify the pitch of a musical tone, or to produce a musical tone at a given pitch without the use of an external reference pitch. Most humans process musical pitch relatively rather than absolutely, and in fact ...


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The difference is in whether the animal has voluntary control over the touch. If the animal touches another object by moving its body to initiate the touch, then the it is active touch. If the animal is touched without control over the movement (for example, a human experimenter grazing the whiskers with a finger), then the touch is passive.


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It can be either, and is typically both, considering that Absolute pitch is an act of cognition, needing memory of the frequency, a label for the frequency (such as "B-flat"), and exposure to the range of sound encompassed by that categorical label. Another way to look at it is that pitch class came from the necessary assessment and organization of ...


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This is a really neat question. A strong predictor of cognitive ability is one's environmental enrichment, or the stimulation of the brain in its physical and social surroundings. Those with sensory deprivation often have less success with social situations and self-esteem, as well as (presumably) less sensory input coming in. The implication is that lack ...


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Speaking as a musician and one-time music teacher, this is not just true of the voice. When an instrumentalist records and plays back a performance, it can be very disconcerting. This is especially true of beginners who often imagine they sound much better than they really do. I suspect that the action of performing somehow suppresses the ability to listen. ...


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Those responding make some very good points about being specific about operational definitions and such. However, I've argued -- in an evolutionary psych textbook -- that there is a probably a reason why discomfort from cold and electric shock have power laws with exponents greater than perceived brightness (at low stimulus intensities), for example. It's ...



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