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I love this kind of research because it shows how there's an affective undercurrent to essentially every part of our lives. This is formalized in microvalence theory (Lebrecht et al., 2012), which posits that all objects, even ordinary ones, are imbued with valence (e.g., explaining why you prefer one chair over another). As far as positive geometric ...


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My answer is going to be super skewed, I think, toward my interests. Nonetheless, I'd consider these papers "revolutionary," and I think their legacy will be long-lasting and their impact expansive (across all domains of psychology). Are emotions natural kinds? (Barrett, 2006). This paper upends many decades of thinking about what emotions are and has ...


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Chomsky's review of Skinner's book Verbal Behavior. This review helped kick off both modern linguistics and the cognitive revolution. Marr and Poggio (1976). Here is where Marr's famous levels of analysis of information processing systems are detailed. These levels provide a framework for organizing all of cognitive science research, in my and many others' ...


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Ok, I will start. I don't necessarily know if these are definitely the best three books I have read, but they are three of the best. If I think of better ones then I will add them. Thinking, Fast and Slow Predictably Irrational Influence: Science and practice My interest in cognitive science is about i) understanding my own irrationality and ii) ...


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Overall, based on my limited research it appears there is no evidence that people who are more logical are more likely to experience depression. There is a theory that people who see the world more accurately (of which rationality would be a component) are more likely to become depressed. It is called depressive realism {1}. However, the theory doesn't seem ...


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Ok I finally found the official demographic norming data from the WAIS-IV on page 104 of this book: "WAIS-IV Clinical Use and Interpretation: Scientist-Practitioner Perspectives" You can see a preview of this book at http://tinyurl.com/z3vr44e. The answer to my question is: Some college: 102.28 College graduates: ...


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If you search for "IQ students" on google scholar since 2012 you will find plenty of literature. However, the problem will be that there are many different "standardised intelligence tests", and not all of them call themselves "IQ". You might want to restrict your search to a specific test like the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale which is one of the most ...


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https://www.researchgate.net/publication/232514979_The_IQ_of_the_average_college_student I found this article that seems to answer your question in the abstract. I didn't bother to sign up and read the whole thing though.



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